37 Replies Latest reply: Apr 16, 2012 12:44 AM by zabrinabenito@yahoo.com RSS

Rubrics

dorothy_jamero@yahoo.com Apprentice
Currently Being Moderated

Answer the following completely and concisely.

  1. What are the advantages and disadvantages of using rubrics in your class?
  2. How are you going to reconcile the use of formative and summative assessments with the use of rubrics in your class?
  • Re: Rubrics
    Novice
    Currently Being Moderated

    Advantages and Disadvantages of the RubricThis is a featured page

    Holistic Rubric Advantages

     

    • Quick scoring and they provide an overview of student achievement.
    • Easily obtain a single dimension if that is adequate for your purpose.

     

    Holistic Rubric Disadvantages

     

    • Not very useful to help plan instruction because they lack a detailed  analysis of a students strengths or weaknesses of a product.
    • Do not provide very detailed information.

     

    Analytical Rubric Advantages

     

    • Provides meaningful and specific feedback along multiple dimensions.
    • Scoring tends to be more consistent across students and grades.
    • Easier for the teacher to share with students and parents about certain strengths and weaknesses.
    • Helps students to better understand the nature of quality work.

     

    Analytical Rubric Disadvantages

     

    • It is more difficult to construct analytical rubrics for all tasks.
    • Tends to be quite time consuming.
    • Lower consistency among different raters.

     

    Advantages of Rubrics in General

     

    • Forces the teacher to clarify criteria in detail.
    • Useful feedback for the effectiveness of instruction.
    • Motivates students to reach the standards specified.
    • Narrows the gap between instruction and assessment.
    • Flexible tool, having uses across many contexts, in many grade levels and for a wide range of abilities.
    • Potential to be transferred into grades if necessary.
    • Can offer a method of consistency in scoring by clearly defining the performance criteria.
    • Giving the child more control of their own learning process.
    • Potential to open communication with caregivers.

     

    Disadvantages of Rubrics in General

     

    • Rubrics can also restrict the students mind power in that they will  feel that they need to complete the assignment strictly to the rubric  instead of taking the initiative to explore their learning.

    • If the criteria that is in the rubric is too complex, students may feel  overwhelmed with the assignment, and little success may be imminent.

    • For the teacher creating the rubric, they may find the task of developing, testing, evaluating, and updating time consuming.

     

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    Advantages and Disadvantages of Various Assessment Methods


    1. Standardized Exams (Commercial)

     

    Advantages


    • Convenient
    • Can be adopted and implemented quickly.
    • Reduces or eliminates faculty time demands in instrument development and grading.
    • Are scored objectively.
    • Provide for external validity.
    • Provide reference group measures.
    • Can make longitudinal comparisons.
    • Can test large numbers of students.

     

    Disadvantages


    • Measures relatively superficial knowledge or learning.
    • Unlikely to match the specific goals and objectives of a program/institution
    • Norm-referenced data may be less useful than criterion-referenced.
    • May be cost prohibitive to administer as a pre- and post-test.
    • More summative than formative (may be difficult to isolate what changes
    are needed).
    • Norm data may be user norms rather than true national sample.
    • May be difficult to receive results in a timely manner.


    Recommendations


    • Must be selected carefully based on faculty review and determination of
    match between test content and curriculum content.
    • Request technical manual and information on reliability and validity from publisher.
    • Check with other users.
    • If possible, purchase data disk for creation of customized reports.
    • If possible, select tests that also provide criterion-referenced results.
    • Check results against those obtained from other assessment methods.
    • Embedding the test as part of a course’s requirements may improve student
    motivation.


    2. Locally Developed Exams


    Advantages


    • Can be tailored to match program and institutional objectives.
    • Specific criteria for performance can be established in relation to the curriculum.
    • Can be used to develop locally meaningful norms.
    • Can obtain results more quickly.
    • Cheaper than commercial exams.
    • Easier to use in a pre- and post-test approach.
    • May be embedded in specific course.


    Disadvantages


    • Complex and time consuming to develop psychometrically valid exams.
    • More costly in time and effort.
    • Requires considerable leadership and coordination.
    • May hinder curriculum change if it means that exam would have to be revised.
    • Vulnerable to student theft and distribution.
    • Results not can not be generalized beyond the program or institution.

     

    Recommendations


    • Development requires strong cooperation by program faculty.
    • Use on-campus experts to assist with test construction and validation.
    • Include outside experts and stakeholders in development and grading process.
    • Consider embedding within a course common to all students in the program.
    • Check results against those obtained from other assessment methods.

     

    3. Performance Measures

     

    Types


    • Essays
    • Oral presentations
    • Oral exams
    • Exhibitions
    • Demonstrations
    • Performances
    • Products
    • Research papers
    • Poster presentations
    • Capstone experiences
    • Practical exams
    • Supervised internships & practicums


    Advantages


    • Can be used to assess from multiple perspectives
    • Using a student-centered design can promote student motivation
    • Can be used to assess transfer of skills and integration of content
    • Engages student in active learning
    • Encourages time on academics outside of class
    • Can provide a dimension of depth not available in classroom
    • Can promote student creativity
    • Can be scored holistically or analytically
    • May allow probes by faculty to gain clearer picture of student understanding or though processes
    • Can provide closing of feedback loop between students and faculty
    • Can place faculty more in a mentor role than as judge
    • Can be summative or formative
    • Can provide an avenue for student self-assessment and reflection
    • Can be embedded within courses
    • Can adapt current assignments
    • Usually the most valid way of assessing skill development


    Disadvantages


    • Usually the mostly costly approach
    • Time consuming and labor intensive to design and execute for faculty and students
    • Must be carefully designed if used to document obtainment of student learning outcomes
    • Ratings can be more subjective
    • Requires careful training of raters
    • Inter-rater reliability must be addressed
    • Production costs may be prohibitive for some students and hamper reliability
    • Sample of behavior or performance may not be typical, especially if observers are present

     

    Recommendations


    • Can be intimidating to students
    • Develop specific, measurable criteria for observing and appraising
    • When possible, use criterion-referenced rating approach instead of simple checklists
    • Develop rubrics for greater consistency between raters
    • Must clearly articulate expectations to students prior to initiation and provide models or performance criteria
    • Consider possible award strategies for enhancing student motivations (best of show, etc)
    • Performances could be videotaped
    • If possible, base assessment on range of products or performances instead of on single items
    • All raters should be trained and inter-rater reliability checked
    • Consider training peers, alumni, and community members as raters

     

    Capstone Experiences


    • “A well thought-out project that is comprehensive in nature and allows students to demonstrate a range of abilities.” (Palomba & Banta, 1999)
    • Need to be carefully planned to provide useful information for assessment of specific learning outcomes and cap off a student’s college experience
    • Can be designed to provide information about SLOs related to the major and general studies
    • Should be designed and evaluated by all of the program’s faculty and not just course instructor
    • May be a specific requirement outside of a course or as part of a designated capstone course
    • Capstone course could also be used to administer standardized or locally developed exams or surveys
    • Clarify effect of student’s grade and/or graduation eligibility (be aware of issues associated with high stakes assessments)

     

    4. Surveys & Questionnaires (students, alumni, employers, public)


    Potential Advantages


    • Easy to administer
    • Can cover a variety of topics in a brief amount of time
    • Helps to establish relationship with stakeholders
    • Easier to communicate results to stakeholders
    • Can be used to gather information from individuals who would be difficult to include in other assessment methods
    • Demonstrates concern about gathering feedback/information


    Potential Disadvantages


    • Information on student learning (perception and opinion) considered to be indirect data
    • Good surveys and questionnaires are difficult to develop
    • Voluntary participation may result in biased results
    • Forced-response choices may not allow individuals to respond as they wish
    • Low response rate


    Recommendations


    • Pilot all instruments
    • Use as a supplement to direct methods of assessment
    • Include open-ended items with forced-choice response surveys


    5. Portfolios


    Types of Portfolios


    • Learning Portfolios
    • Assessment Portfolios
    • Marketing Portfolios
    • Job Portfolios
    • Showcase Portfolios
    • Performance Portfolios
    • Personal Portfolios
    • Proficiency/Competency Portfolios
    • Process Portfolios
    • Developmental Portfolios
    • Hybrid Portfolios

     

    Potential Advantages


    • Shows sophistication in student performance
    • Illustrates longitudinal trends
    • Highlight student strengths
    • Identify student weaknesses for remediation, if timed properly
    • Can be used to view learning and development longitudinally
    • Multiple components of the curriculum can be assessed (e.g. writing, critical thinking, technology skills)
    • Samples are more likely than test results to reflect student ability when planning, input from others, and similar opportunities common to more work settings are available
    • Process of reviewing and evaluating portfolios provide an excellent opportunity for faculty exchange and development, discussion of curriculum goals and objectives, review of criteria, and program feedback
    • May be economical in terms of student time and effort if no separate assessment administration time is required
    • Greater faculty control over interpretation and use of results
    • Results are more likely to be meaningful at all levels (student, class, program, institution) and can be used for diagnostic and prescriptive purposes as well
    • Avoids or minimizes test anxiety and other one-shot measurement problems
    • Increases power of maximum performance measures over more artificial or restrictive speed measures on test or in-class sample
    • Increases student participation (selection, revision, and evaluation) in the assessment process
    • Could match well with Morningside’s mission to cultivate lifelong learning
    • Can be used to gather information about students’ assignments and experiences
    • Reflective statements could be used to gather information about student satisfaction

     

    Potential Disadvantages


    • Portfolio will be no better than the quality of the collected artifacts
    • Time consuming and challenging to evaluate
    • Space and ownership challenges make evaluation difficult
    • Content may vary widely among students
    • Students may fail to remember to collect items
    • Transfer students may not be in the position to provide complete portfolio
    • Time intensive to convert to meaningful data
    • Costly in terms of evaluator time and effort
    • Management of the collection and evaluation process, including the establishment of reliable and valid grading criteria, is likely to be challenging
    • May not provide for externality
    • If samples to be included have been previously submitted for course grades, faculty may be concerned that a hidden agenda of the process is to validate their grading
    • Security concerns may arise as to whether submitted samples are the students’ own work or adhere to other measurement criteria
    • Must consider whether and how graduates will be allowed continued access to their portfolios
    • Inter-rater reliability must be addressed
    Recommendations
    • Clear expectations about the purpose and collection responsibilities will help students succeed in using the portfolio method. The works that student select will be more satisfying if the student can compare to established criteria. If the faculty wants student portfolios to represent student development over time, they will need to be scrupulous about setting forth the performance demand of collecting and examining works throughout the student's career.
    • The success of the portfolio may be enhanced when students reflect on how all the pieces work together to express their learning or meet department criteria.
    • Consider having portfolios submitted as part of course requirements, especially a capstone course at the end of a program
    • Use portfolios from a representative sample of students rather than having all students participate (this approach may save considerable time, effort, and expense but be problematic in other ways)
    • Develop specific, measurable criteria for observing and appraising
    • When possible, use criterion-referenced rating approach instead of simple checklists
    • Develop rubrics for greater consistency between raters
    • Have more than one rater for each portfolio, establish inter-rater reliability through piloting designed to fine-tune rating criteria
    • Provide training for raters and check inter-rater reliability
    • Recognize that portfolios in which samples are selected by the student probably represent their best work rather than typical work
    • Cross-validate portfolios with more controlled student assessments for increased validity
    • The conceptual framework for a student learning portfolio needs to be based on (1) agreed upon student learning goals and objectives, (2) consideration of what faculty want to learn from the portfolios, and (3) consideration of what students should learn from the process

     

    Source: Morningside College, Assessment Handbook
    Advantages and Disadvantages of Various Assessment Methods
    (http://www.morningside.edu/academics/research/assessment/documents/advantagesdisadvantages.pdf, March 2006)

     

    TO BE CONTINUED...

  • Re: Rubrics
    Apprentice
    Currently Being Moderated

    >> yes

  • Re: Rubrics
    Newbie
    Currently Being Moderated

    what are the advantages? i can only say 2... i can generalize that its more authentic and reliable compared to traditional style of giving grades or assessing

    its more authentic. why? in rubric we have guides that we use especially if it is analytic. in that sense alone you can think critically as to what grade you will be giving to your students. it is also authentic because by using rubric we are eliminating or minimizing biases.Example: if there is a performance done by the students a traditional teacher will just grade his or her student according to his own personal perception or even based on his or her mood. this style is totally against the principle of giving good assesment.next, it is more reliable. why?  it is because assesments are done according to the students performnce or product not based on the teacher.

    disadvantages?

    hmmmm.. it will take us more time to think. instead doing something else like surfing the net, facebook twitter etc. hehehe, in using rubric u really have to sit down and take time to think so that you can give reliable and authentic assesments for the students.

    ... how can i reconcile to the formative and summative assesment?.. well, not all tests are objectives there are also subjectives. we can use rubric when we want to grade how good is the essay of our students in which essay type of test can be given as a summative or fomative test. anyway it still depends upon the teacher way of grading his or her students.

  • Re: Rubrics
    Newbie
    Currently Being Moderated

    Advantages (General)

              First, they  are very useful tools for both teaching and evaluation of learning outcomes. Rubrics have the potential to improve student performance , as well as monitor it, by clarifying teachers' expectations and by actually guiding the students how to satisfy these expectations.

     

              Secondly, in several experiments involving the use of rubrics, students progressively became more aware of the problems associated with their solution  to a problem and with the probelms inherent in the solutions of other  students. in other words, rubrics increase the students' sense of responsibilty and acountability.

     

              Third, rubrics are quite efficient and tend to require less time for the teachers in evaluating student  performance. Teachers tend to find that by the time a piece has been self- and peer-assessed  according to rubric, they have little  left to say  about it. When they do have something to say , they can often simply cirlce  an item in the rubric, rather than struggling to explain the flaw or strength  they have noticed and figuring out what to suggest in terms of improvements. Rubric Provide students with more informative feedback about their strengths and areas in need of improvement.

     

              Finally, Most of the items found in the rubrics scoring guide are self-explanatory and require no further help from outside experts.

     

    Advanatges according to type of Rubrics


    Holistic   : Quick scoring provdes an overview of student achievement.

    Analytic   : More detailed  feedback, scoring is mnore consistent across students graders.

    General Rubric:  Can use the same rubric across different tasks.

    Task specific Rubrics: More reliable  assesment for performance.

     

    Disadvantages ((General)

     

    • Rubrics can also restrict the students mind power in that they will feel that they need to complete the assignment strictly to the rubric instead of taking the initiative to explore their learning.
    • If the criteria that is in the rubric is too complex, students may feel overwhelmed with the assignment, and little success may be imminent.
    • For the teacher creating the rubric, they may find the task of developing, testing, evaluating, and updating time consuming.

     

    Disadvantages according to type of Rubrics


    Holistic:Does not provide detailed information , may difficult to provide one overall score.

    Analytic: Time consumign to score.

    General Rubrics:Feedback may not be specific enough.

    Task specific Rubric: Difficult to construct rubrics for all tasks.

     

     

              We mentioned that "rubrics can be used  for both formative and summative evaluation".  It is possible then to merge the use of  formative and summative evaluation with the use of rubrics in our class. For example, ( the teacher asked the students to perform the "dula" before discussing the short story, Bahay  na Bato, formative) in a  rubric for  "DULA" ( Short story: " Bahay na Bato") aside from evaluating the "dula" that will be performed by the students , the teacher may include the following in the rubric "Dapat isa-alang alang sa pag arte , sa paggamit kasuutan at make up " that had been discussed in the previuos unit (Summative).

     

     

    References:

    http://epsyrubrics.wetpaint.com/page/Advantages+and+Disadvantages+of+the+Rubric

     

    *Assessment of Learning 1 notes..

  • Re: Rubrics
    Newbie
    Currently Being Moderated

    For me, the advantages of rubrics in class is that there will be no bias and it will be transparent style of grading or scoring the work of our students. Our students will not be able to ask question why there grade is like this or like that, just let them see the rubrics and they will be able to answer there own question. We should also esplain to our students what rubris is all about, especially in using it in grading their output. The disadvantage for me is that it will be strict in part of the students because it will take a lot of requirements that they may not be able to accomplish.

  • Re: Rubrics
    Apprentice
    Currently Being Moderated

    What are the advantages and disadvantages of using rubrics in your class?

    Advantages of Rubrics

    1. Rubrics are used in scoring outputs and performances of students.

    • Rubrics      are more appropriate tools for scoring outputs and performances than the      traditional paper and pencil test. This is because rubrics have criteria      that are used in accordance with what is being measured and what is      supposed to measure. Usually, skills and the applications of the concepts      are being measured in outputs and performances.

    2. Rubrics serve as guides for teacher and for peer evaluation.

    • Since      the criteria and the range of scores are already given, teachers and      students can easily give the appropriate scores to the performances or      outputs. Also, the students would be able to know the points to focus on      in making outputs and showing performances.

    3. Rubrics encourage active and participative learning.

    • Students      are also given the chance to score their classmates using rubrics.      Consequently, the students will be more participative and active in      watching their classmates perform in front. They will listen more closely      and watch attentively so that they will give the appropriate score for      each criterion.

    4. Rubrics are more objective and can provide consistency of scoring among evaluators.

    • Descriptors      are given for scoring. These descriptors have specific traits that students      should meet, thus, the evaluator fairly gives scores because s/he can      easily identify what skills or standards are met or not.

    5. Rubrics can provide useful feedbacks of the students’ strengths and weaknesses.

    • These      feedbacks are very useful for they motivate the students to improve their      weaknesses and to enhance more their strengths. Consequently, they      students become more self-directed and independent learners.

    6. Rubrics are made to cater to the capabilities and needs of students.

    • The      teachers, with the help of the students, may adjust the criteria or range      of scores to be placed. They can agree on what will be focused on or what      is important.

    7. Rubrics show more tangible and comprehensive proof of students’ performance that may be shard with the parents.

    • During      conferences, rubrics can be shown to the parents to give them the overview      of their children’s achievements or points for improvements. In this way,      parents can monitor their child’s progress, thus, help and guide them      more.

    Disadvantages of Rubrics

    1. Rubrics can restrict the students’ creativity and innovation.

    • Rubrics      can limit the students to create something new and different because there      is the need to complete the assignment strictly as set by the rubrics.      They may not develop creativity or take the initiative to explore.

    2. Rubrics may be too complex that the students cannot very well understand.

    • Students      may be overwhelmed with the assignment, that they may find difficulty in      doing it. Hence, it may turn out to be unsuccessful.

    3. Rubrics are difficult to construct.

    • For      the teacher creating the rubric, they may find the task of developing,      testing, evaluating, and updating time consuming.


    How are you going to reconcile the use of formative and summative assessments with the use of rubrics in your class?

         Summative assessment conducted after a program of study has been implemented and completed. It is generally used to provide information about a student's current state of knowledge or to determine a student's progress towards an agreed upon set of standards. The summative assessments, such as products or performance, are usually scored using rubrics. Summative assessments can build the scaffold upon which students are guided, especially when given to the students prior to being graded. In such a way, they help the students understand the standards expected of them.  And so, in these times that formative assessment comes in handy.

         Formative assessment occurs during the learning process. It can provide information about a student's strengths and weaknesses. It can also be used to assess progress on a project. In addition, formative assessment is designed to help the students keep on track during a project or assignment making. A rubric can be used while the project making is ongoing. This will help the students to know and understand the standards that they are expected to meet. Rubrics can provide detailed feedback (formative assessment) to improve their future performance and help them complete the rest of the assignment well. Hence, the students can assess their performance and learning process. The rubric will be scored simply to guide the students. This is very essential for group projects because if the group lose track on the process they may not complete the whole task and the project would be put at risk. A formative assessment using rubrics can help determine if the groups are on the right track and are working on the same goal.

     

     

  • Re: Rubrics
    Newbie
    Currently Being Moderated

         A rubric is an evaluation tool that describes the criteria for performance at various levels using demonstrative verbs. It is a performance-based assessment process that accurately reflects content skills, process skills, work habits, and learning results.


         There are generally two types of rubrics: holistic and analytic.   It is important to analyze the task, activity or project being assessed and determine which type of rubric is most appropriate to apply.  A holistic rubric describes a student’s work as a single score--the report or project as a whole is assigned a score.   Therefore, holistic rubrics are best suited to tasks that can be performed or evaluated as a whole and/or those that may not require extensive feedback.  Analytic rubrics specify criteria to be assessed at each performance level, provide a separate score for each criterion. Its functions are:  General rubrics contain criteria that are general across tasks.  It can use the same rubric across different tasks but its feedback may not be specific enough. Task specific rubrics are unique to a specific task.  It is more reliable assessment of performance on the task but difficult to construct rubrics for all specific tasks.


         Rubrics can be used for both formative and summative evaluation. For example, the teacher will ask the students to have a dance showcase: Jazz in Inter Physical Education. They were to discuss what is Jazz all about, its basic elements, and how it is to be dance. Formative assessment used to assess progress of the students in the project given and it is a guide for them to know what to be improving more and what is being lack. Afterwards, as a summative assessment, they will dance in the public to tests their confidence and how they deliver the dance. They are graded based on the skills, attitude, and appearance that they have shown individually and as a whole group.

  • Re: Rubrics
    Newbie
    Currently Being Moderated

    Advantages of Rubrics:

    • Helps the grading process become more efficient.
    • Helps teacher score more accurately, fairly and reliably.
    • Requires teacher to set and define more precisely the criteria used in the grading process.
    • Supports uniform and standardized grading processes
    • Clarifies quality expectations to students about their assignments/ projects.
    • Students are able to self-assess their own work.
    • Students can understand better the rationale and the reason for grades.
    • Helps communicating scoring/grading between teacher and students.
    • Helps improve student performance, because they know what to focus on.

    Disadvantages of Rubrics:

    • Development of rubrics can be complex and time-consuming.
    • Using the correct language to express performance expectation can be difficult.
    • Defining the correct set of criteria to define performance can be complex.
    • Rubrics might need to be continuously revised before it can actually be usable in an easy fashion.

         Yes, it is possible to used formative and summative evaluation. In case that the teacher has a project on Art exhibit. As a formative assessment, they were going first to discuss what art will they are making, the types of it, the different strokes, and how they will make it. The teacher will assess now their works. It is a guide for students how they will to improve their works and help them keep on track. As a summative assessment, they will exhibit all their works and graded individually as Artistic link between mural and decoration, Creativity (originality), and Concept.

    • Re: Rubrics
      Apprentice
      Currently Being Moderated

      Sir Jeoffrey, I have to agree with you.  it is also applicable for a science investigatory project where in students are taught by basic concepts and knowledge of the procedures of scientific methods   so they will be able to properly do it by its assigned procedures and use rubrics to  set standards on coming up with a meaningful problems or concerns to  put solutions to  and create a useful, tangible output.

    • Re: Rubrics
      Apprentice
      Currently Being Moderated

      Jeoffrey,


      You have a really good example of summative assessment for arts. An art exhibit is a really good way of showcasing the artworks of the students. In this way, the teachers, the students, the parents, and other people could evaluate their works.

  • Re: Rubrics
    Apprentice
    Currently Being Moderated

     

    ma'am, sorry po kung ngayon ko lang nai-send to..hindi ko po naihabol kagabi kasi hindi ako naka-connect sa internet namin sa bahay...pasensya na po.

  • Re: Rubrics
    Apprentice
    Currently Being Moderated

    *Assessment of Learning 1 notes.

    1. What are the advantages and disadvantages of using rubrics in your class?

     

    Rubrics are modern assessment method to describe student’s performance. These are assessment mechanism used to evaluate activities. Rubrics can be used to focus on the learning objectives being assessed  allowing  teachers to tune out extraneous  variables , summaries of results  to reveal  patterns of students  strengths and areas  of concern. It also allows teachers to identify and monitor ineffective learning objectives and make changes to previous estimate in order to make it more accurate and more effective to students that require increased attention. There are four types of rubrics namely holistic, analytic, and general and task specific.  These four types of rubrics have some advantages according to the type of rubrics:

     

    Holistic  

    • Quick scoring provides an overview of student achievement
    • Emphasizes on what the learner is able to demonstrate, rather than what she/he cannot do.
    • Saves time by minimizing the number of decisions raters make
    • Can be applied consistently by trained rate increasing reliability

    Analytic

    • More detailed feedback, scoring is more consistent across students graders
    • Provide useful feedback on areas of strength and weakness of the students
    • Criterion can be weighted to reflect the relative importance of each dimension

    General Rubric

    • Can use be use across different tasks

    Task specific Rubrics

    • More reliable assessment for performance

     

    In General, rubrics are to Teachers:

     

    • Teachers can increase the quality of their direct instruction by providing focus, emphasis, and attention to particular details as a model for students
    • Teachers can reuse rubrics for various activities
    • Rubrics allow teachers assessment to be more objective and consistent
    • Rubrics allows teachers to minimize subjectivity
    • Rubrics allows and force the teachers to clarify his/her criteria in specific terms
    • Rubrics reduce the amount of time teachers spend evaluating student work
    • Rubrics provide useful feedback to the teacher regarding the effectiveness of the instruction

     

    In general, rubrics are to students:

     

    • Rubrics improve students' end products and therefore increase their learning
    • Students are able to understand on how they are going to be evaluated and prepare accordingly. Thus, eliciting  self confidence to the students for a better understanding
    • Rubric provides scaffolding  as necessary to improve the quality of their work and increase their knowledge
    • Rubrics improve student performance by clearly showing the student how their work will be evaluated and what is expected
    • Rubrics help students become better judges of the quality of their own work
    • Rubric allows students experience “fairness”. Thus, elicits self-confidence and increase motivation within the students to work well
    • Rubrics promote student awareness about the criteria to use in assessing peer performance.
    • Rubrics provide students with more informative feedback about their strengths and areas in need of improvement.
    •   Rubrics accommodate heterogeneous classes by offering a range of quality levels.
    • Rubrics are easy to use and easy to explain

     

    Disadvantages according to the type of rubrics:

     

    Holistic 

    • Does not provide detailed information , may difficult to provide one overall score
    • Not very useful to help plan instruction because they lack a detailed analysis of a student strengths or weaknesses of a product

    Analytic

    • It is more difficult to construct analytical rubrics for all tasks
    • Tends to be quite time consuming
    • Lower consistency among different rates

    General Rubrics

    • Feedback may not be specific enough

    Task specific Rubric

    • Difficult to construct rubrics for all tasks

     

    In General, rubrics are to Teachers:

    • For the teachers in creating the rubric, they may find the task of developing, testing, evaluating, and updating time consuming

     

    In General, rubrics are to students:

    • It  can impede the students      mind power in that they will feel that they need to complete the      assignment so strictly to the rubric instead of taking the initiative to      explore learning on their own
    • If criteria’s in that rubric is too complex, students could  feel overwhelmed with the assignment, and      little success may be imminent

    2. How are you going to reconcile the use of formative and summative assessments with the use of rubrics in your class?

     

    •    Review and observations in a classroom would fall under formative assessment.  A formative assessment is a current process of learning. Teachers use formative assessment to improve instructional methods and student feedback throughout the teaching and learning process. Formative assessments enables teachers to easily determine and monitor students if they acquired, learned and appreciate fundamental knowledge very easily, effectively and accurately based on the teachers teaching strategies and methods and also with teachers facilitating them (facilitate means-making it more easier for the students but not doing the entire work for the students) this could be in a variety of forms such as observations, review activities, exercises and drills, and even recitations. If incase that the performance of the students was defined as ineffective that is the time that the teacher should improve oneself in making a more effective teaching strategies  and methods for the students to further gain knowledge  before summing up and  applying entirely those concepts  or knowledge in real life situations. Actually, formative assessments and summative assessments  are naturally connected  with each other with or without rubrics because  how are we able to make a tangible, concrete and a perfect output if we do not have any prior knowledge about it, or we do not expect something to come out in  just an instant without knowing why did it appeared at the first place .let’s say, it is just like what a pharmacists does- a pharmacists cannot make a good and effective  medicine without knowing its chemical components. That is why pharmacists do chemical analysis.  It is very crucial to the students to apply something that they had never learned beforehand.  After acquisition of knowledge, it has to continue progressing and within the project making process, which still is under the current process, there, has to be given set of standards this is brought about by an instrument, which is the rubric for a more profound understanding and come up with deeper ideas for the betterment of the project. Rubrics are used during project making process because it will help the students know and understand the standards that they are expected to meet and focus on what are essential because  Rubrics provide detailed feedback  from formative assessment. Scores from rubrics guides the students to improve their ideas in future performance to the point that they are able to deepen understanding and create meaningful ideas essential for their project and be persistent in completing the whole task of the project as their summative assessment.

     

    (I hope I made a point, One of the hardest questions I encountered.)

     

     

    Some source links where I based my answers:

    http://fcit.usf.edu/assessment/basic/basica.html

    http://epsyrubrics.wetpaint.com/page/Advantages+and+Disadvantages+of+the+Rubric

    http://weaeducation.typepad.co.uk/files/blackbox-1.pdf

     

     

    God bless on our exams!

  • Re: Rubrics
    Newbie
    Currently Being Moderated
    Advantages and Disadvantages of the RubricThis is a featured page
          Holistic Rubric Advantages

    • Quick scoring and they provide an overview of student achievement.
    • Easily obtain a single dimension if that is adequate for your purpose.
          Holistic Rubric Disadvantages

     

    • Not very useful to help plan instruction because they lack a detailed  analysis of a students strengths or weaknesses of a product.
    • Do not provide very detailed information.
         Analytical Rubric Advantages

     

    • Provides meaningful and specific feedback along multiple dimensions.
    • Scoring tends to be more consistent across students and grades.
    • Easier for the teacher to share with students and parents about certain strengths and weaknesses.
    • Helps students to better understand the nature of quality work.
         Analytical Rubric Disadvantages

     

    • It is more difficult to construct analytical rubrics for all tasks.
    • Tends to be quite time consuming.
    • Lower consistency among different raters.
         Advantages of Rubrics in General

     

    • Forces the teacher to clarify criteria in detail.
    • Useful feedback for the effectiveness of instruction.
    • Motivates students to reach the standards specified.
    • Narrows the gap between instruction and assessment.
    • Flexible tool, having uses across many contexts, in many grade levels and for a wide range of abilities.
    • Potential to be transferred into grades if necessary.
    • Can offer a method of consistency in scoring by clearly defining the performance criteria.
    • Giving the child more control of their own learning process.
    • Potential to open communication with caregivers.
         Disadvantages of Rubrics in General

     

    • Rubrics can also restrict the students mind power in that they will  feel that they need to complete the assignment strictly to the rubric  instead of taking the initiative to explore their learning.
    • If the criteria that is in the rubric is too complex, students may feel  overwhelmed with the assignment, and little success may be imminent.
    • For the teacher creating the rubric, they may find the task of developing, testing, evaluating, and updating time consuming.

     

    ADVANTAGES OF RUBRICS:

     

    • Rubrics improve student performance by clearly showing the student how their work will be evaluated and wehat is expected.
    • rubrics help students become lbetter judges of quality of their own work.
    • rubriics allow assessment to be more objective and coonsistent.
    • rubrics provide usefull feedback to the teacher regarding the effectiveness of the instruction.
    • rubrics promotes student awareness about the criteria in assessing peer performance.
    • rubrics provide students with more informative feedback about their strength and areas in need of improvement.
    • rubric accomodate heterogenous classes by offering a range of quality levels.
    • rubrics are easy to use and easy to score.

    --In general rubrics is very advantagous to both student and teacher because it is very usefull and helpfull to both student and teacher in assessing the performance of the students.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     



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