35 Replies Latest reply on Jul 29, 2012 9:12 PM by akbusybee@gmail.com

    Intel Teach Live May 2012 - Adaptive Technology

    MrsSmoke

      bunnyatwork_small.jpg

      So much technology innovation has been inspired to support the independence of special needs students.  From early recorded books for the blind to the latest text to speech applications for easier communication, assistive technology is truly amazing.  Now with the onset of mobile apps and innovation changing at rapid paces, doors are opening in every direction not only for students with physical disabilities, but for gifted and talented students, as well.

       

      Click here to view the recording.


      For this thread, we are asking your perspective on our essential question: How is technology shrinking limitation gaps for special needs students and providing them better scaffolding for success?


      Post your resources between May 20 and July 1 to be entered into a drawing for Flip Slide Camera + Tripod.

       

      Note: This drawing will only become active when a minimum of 10 participants respond, which means in some cases, the drawing will take place after the above mentioned date. For a complete description and eligibility of Engage community drawings, click on the Intel Bunny Person.


      21st Century Skills Addressed in this Webinar -
      Depending on how a digital storytelling project was directed, any or all of these 21st Century Skills would be addressed:
      Communication,  Collaboration, Creativity, Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, Media and Technology Skills, Self-Direction

       

      ISTE Standards Addressed in this Webinar:

       

      All NETS-T standards would be implemented in an exemplary 21st Century Project
      1. Facilitate and Inspire Student Learning and Creativity
      c. Promote student reflection using collaborative tools to reveal and clarify students' conceptual understanding and thinking, planning, and creative processes.

        • Re: Intel Teach Live May 2012 - Adaptive Technology

          I am SUPER excited about this opportunity! I am Andrea Keller and I currently teach children with varying abilities in a k-5 LIFE (living in a functional environment) classroom.  With all of the different technologies offered to students at at all levels, I find it is just as important to include students with disabilities with the same opportunities.  During my portion of the webinar I am going to show some of my favorite sites, resources, and information on how I modify and adapt so my students can particpate in web 2.0 technologies!  I look forward to continuing this discussion.  If you get a chance be sure to check out our blog (which has over 1400 hits from all over the world!) www.kellerbusybees.blogspot.com  See you guys next week!

          • Re: Intel Teach Live May 2012 - Adaptive Technology

            This past school year, my grade had numerous sped kids, a number of whom are on the autism spectrum. One of my autistic students used the ipad 2 to prepare presentations that would otherwise be done in person in front of the class. With the help of his teachers, he videotaped himself speaking about his projects and took photos of his materials, products, and data (for science projects). He could then share with the rest of the class.

             

            This greatly helped his verbal expression and motivated him to work on the projects (he loves using the ipads). And he thoroughly enjoyed watching himself in these presentations.

            • Re: Intel Teach Live May 2012 - Adaptive Technology
              diana_M

              I did attend the webinar in May and thought both presenters gave a wealth of information that I will be able to use for my students.  They gave many resources and ideas.  Technology is benefiting all and the use of technology for special needs students and adults is so important.  I have a friend who is a professor and suffered from a brain injury in a car wreck.  After a year, her college is now providing technological tools which will allow her to continue to do the job she loves.  Another friend had Lou Gehrig's disease and benefited from sound boards which he could operate with his toe and a camera which could be operated with his eye. His quality of life and dignity was preserved as he was able to communicate. I was so impressed with Andrea's and Ginger's webinar.  I want to create videos which demonstrate desired social skills (walking in line, daily routines), start a live binder, visit their websites and use their suggested iPad resources.  Thanks again for inspiring and sharing you knowledge. 

              • Re: Intel Teach Live May 2012 - Adaptive Technology

                The webinar was very inspiring and I immediately began to think of the young PPCD students who come into my prekindergarten classroom each afternoon. In trying to answer the question about shrinking the limitation gaps I can't help but think of the visual and auditory appeal of the apps on the iPads. With the ability to customize a project or program for special needs children, I think that the presenters in May are definalety trend-setters. I love the live binders that they have set up and will be looking closely at their resources and ideas in the next month. I will have one CP child in my classroom and want to create some specialized instructional projects for her. Also, so many of the children have short attention spans, and I have observed that they can focus for longer periods of time when using this technology. I look forward to following the presenters next year. Thanks for sharing your blog, Andrea.

                • Re: Intel Teach Live May 2012 - Adaptive Technology

                  I think that not only technology is shrinking limitation gaps for students with special needs, it is also becoming a valuable resource for our youngest learners. As a former special ed teacher, kindergarten teacher, and now current 1st grade teacher, I love how I have been able to give my emerging writers and readers a voice when telling stories and sharing what they have learned. I have found that even using a voice recorder or digital camera (or ipod/ipad) students are able to express what they have learned or already know about a topic. Sometimes when asking a child to draw or write what they know (or have learned) they are not always able to express themselves. Recording their voice explaining their thinking is so valuable. I love when my students are able to make connections among what we have already learned, are learning, and the world around them. I love using multiple apps on my ipods and ipads to re-teach topics for my struggling students or students with special needs and also to extend the topic for my gifted learners. I am looking forward to what the future holds!

                  • Re: Intel Teach Live May 2012 - Adaptive Technology

                    I teach in an inclusion classrooms. I have students with many varying needs. As a teacher, it is a challenge to reach each child's potential. I have found that technology has helped me to bridge each student to their potential. The technology applications I've used are ones that many have access to, such as allowing students to type when they struggle with writing skills, or taking a spelling test online so that words can be repeated as needed and students go at their own pace. The thing I value most, is that technology allows me to differentiate and work at each child's pace and level. I have also seen our support staff use tablets with students that help keep a visual schedule or used as method to calm students down. I am very interested to branch out and help our resource department utilize technology to help all students reach their potential.

                     

                    -Audrey

                    • Re: Intel Teach Live May 2012 - Adaptive Technology

                      I can respond to this as a parent. My son is 9 years old and has CP. He is non-verbal and is completely wheelchair dependent. I have always felt like he understands everything we say, but have the challenge of finding a way for him to communicate. He currently receives services in the resource room in his neighborhood school.

                       

                      He currently has an Ipad and we are exploring various apps that would allow him to communicate. During summer school this past month, he started trying out another computer system and it had a sensor that was placed in the middle of his forehead. When he moved his head, it worked like a cursor for him to choose an activity. He did a great job with this program. Another student was mentoring him and she uses this system for her total communication.

                       

                      I am so excited about the world of technology and what it may allow my son to do!! We just don't know what wonderful technology will be developed over the next years!

                       

                      ~Marcie

                      • Re: Intel Teach Live May 2012 - Adaptive Technology
                        nubia7

                        I am a PPCD teacher and most of my students are non-verbal. It is very hard to check for understanding or to know what my students want or need. In my classroom, it is essential the use of technology. We use: Board Maker software, Go Talk devices, iPads, smart pens, cameras, flip videos, and iPods. Also, we use web tools.

                        • Re: Intel Teach Live May 2012 - Adaptive Technology

                          Students deserve the chance to reach their full potential and with technology students with special needs have that opportunity.  I had a student this past year that struggled with Dysgraphia.  With the support of computer, IPAD, and smart pen he was able to overcome his difficulties with spelling, handwriting and putting his thoughts on paper.  He benefited from practicing letter strokes with IPAD apps, he was able to create writing pieces on computer and he enjoyed dictating oral responses to tests with the use of a smart pen.  Teachers/school districts need to continue to integrate technology into the classrooms that match physical and cognitive abilities of students with special needs.  I believe technology in the classroom provides freedom for all.

                          • Re: Intel Teach Live May 2012 - Adaptive Technology

                            I love technology apps for all learners.  My 504 students made great progress this year with the help of a great teacher, but also listening to what they were reading, and being able to demonstrate what they had learned by reading. This was possible only with the applications offered by our reading text online.  They also had access to an ipad, ipod, and regular use of a laptop, all of which increased their self confidence and allowed them to present their class projects in the same way the gen ed students were able to present theirs.

                             

                            I love dragon for writing.  I remember trying to use this app 10 years ago and it was so painful - it did not work for children and not even for middle schoolers and it was difficult for adults.  The latest versions are so wonderful it seems like magic to me.  It's a definite keeper.

                             

                            The latest and greatest digital story telling apps, recording stories, writing with livescribe pens, creating comics and books, and slide shows and movies is so exciting.  Although, the old tell a story about the castle XYZ publisher from the 90's was great then  and helped many children, not everyone had access to a computer to use it or had even heard about it.  I'm looking forward to using the apps Andrea shared last year and going even further with the talents of all children.  One of the greatest things about the ipad is the publicity it's receiving.  That alone is going to benefit all learners.

                             

                            Technology is going to be the difference between watching others and working with others for our sped, 504 and yes, our ELL kids next year.  I can't wait. It is also going to give our gifted students a way to stretch themselves in many different directions.  They'll be able to dig so much deeper into their subjects, present them in so many different ways, and they'll be able to share them in so many different venues.

                             

                            "Livescribe in the morning, Dragon in the evenin', Google docs at suppertime."  (An old song for you youngsters - substitute sugar for underlined)  Not to forget the digital story telling, the SEL apps, the plain vanilla word processing dressed up with doodads, and the browsers that read to us sprinkled in between. 

                             

                            There is a phrase I'm trying to remember... that technology will be making everything equal... let me google it..

                            Yes, technology will be the great playing field leveler for not just students, but everyone.  Let's not forget to work for equal access while we're at it:)

                             

                            Yes, I'm getting older, but technology is keeping the field level for me too!

                             

                            I am grateful to everyone who is working to make knowledge and learning accessible to everyone!

                            • Re: Intel Teach Live May 2012 - Adaptive Technology

                              I think technology has really leveled the playing field.  My lower achieving and special education students can use technology to scaffold their learning in so many ways.   With great Math apps like Splash Math they can apply what we have learnt in whole class time independently and receive instant unbiased feedback, the format is engaging and interactive - their concentration span is enhanced SOOOO much compared to drill and kill worksheets.  Having access to tools that simplify the English on websites enables them to pull out the main ideas and key concepts, and having web pages that will read the text to them if they get stuck with a word is wonderful.  I can also direct them to a topic in advance so they can have a chance to prelook at it. I haven't used Dragon and Livescribe in the classroom setting but think tools like this will really come into their own with common core.  

                              • Re: Intel Teach Live May 2012 - Adaptive Technology

                                I'm a deaf ed teacher.  Technology is extremely important in 'shrinking limitation gaps' for my students.  2.0 apps, video cameras and editing tools, iPads, iPods, computers are all tools that my students can use to share and collaborate with other students (hearing and deaf).  I've worked with students on making visual reports with story telling applications such as animoto.  With these programs the student can give information in picture form, written form, or my students can even videotape themselves telling the information in sign language and then type in captions so that non-signing teachers and classmates can understand.  Technology continues to be an important part of my students' lives closing the communication gaps even after they leave school. 

                                • Re: Intel Teach Live May 2012 - Adaptive Technology

                                  I personally have not had to work with a lot of students that required any adaptive tools in their education. So I would say I'm definitely not the expert to answer this question.  The only time I really experienced technology helping a student with special needs was when I had a student that could not talk.  I believe he finally found an app on his ipod that allowed him to input what he wanted to say.  This was excellent in a class where individual participation in group discussions is an expectation. After listening to the webinar, I realize I'm really behind as related to all the wonderful technology out there.

                                  • Re: Intel Teach Live May 2012 - Adaptive Technology

                                    I'm a little late to this thread, but just want to thank everyone who participated in making this webinar happen, from the coordinators (yay!) to the attendees, both live and later. Here's a link to the LiveBinder I created and shared on during the webinar: Apps for Gifted and High-Ability Learners - LiveBinder

                                     

                                    This is a comprehensive list that does more than simply gives core content-related apps. I compiled this list to help with teachers who would like to take their students further with creativity, special interests, problem-solving skills, as well as authentic tools/apps used by those working in specific career cluster fields. I think that our gifted kids need more than simple content acceleration or deeper content learning; they need to practice the authentic lifeskills and habits that will carry them into a myriad of interests.

                                     

                                    If you have suggestions or ideas for addition or improvement, I'd love to include them in a future publishing of this LiveBinder. And if you have questions about how to use LiveBinders, I'd be delighted to talk with you about that as well. :-)

                                     

                                    Thank you for allowing me to become more a part of this vibrant education community!

                                    • Re: Intel Teach Live May 2012 - Adaptive Technology
                                      deafteach

                                      I work with hearing impaired middle school and high school students.  The students I work with are mainstreamed into hearing classrooms, and technology is one way to get that gap between "General Education", and "Special Education".  When a student is working with a computer, they can take the time to write, edit, and reedit information before putting written material out to the world in the forms of emails, Facebook, and blogs.  Students with hearing disabilities can communicate with their hearing peers through texting.  This levels the playing field, since students do not need an interpreter to be the intermediaries between their friends and themselves.  The  student with a hearing disability can chat and have a private conversation without an adult listening in.  That is leveling the playing field.  Students with hearing disabilities can learn to make videos, chat, and almost anything else the world throws at them,  The time and effort they put into learning the skill might be more than a "general education" student, but it can be done.  Computers can bring the hearing and deaf in line with each other and can empower the deaf child.

                                      • Re: Intel Teach Live May 2012 - Adaptive Technology
                                        deafteach

                                        I work with hearing impaired middle school and high school students.  The students I work with are mainstreamed into hearing classrooms, and technology is one way to get that gap between "General Education", and "Special Education".  When a student is working with a computer, they can take the time to write, edit, and reedit information before putting written material out to the world in the forms of emails, Facebook, and blogs.  Students with hearing disabilities can communicate with their hearing peers through texting.  This levels the playing field, since students do not need an interpreter to be the intermediaries between their friends and themselves.  The  student with a hearing disability can chat and have a private conversation without an adult listening in.  That is leveling the playing field.  Students with hearing disabilities can learn to make videos, chat, and almost anything else the world throws at them,  The time and effort they put into learning the skill might be more than a "general education" student, but it can be done.  Computers can bring the hearing and deaf in line with each other and can empower the deaf child.

                                        • Re: Intel Teach Live May 2012 - Adaptive Technology
                                          deafteach

                                          I work with hearing impaired middle school and high school students.  The students I work with are mainstreamed into hearing classrooms, and technology is one way to get that gap between "General Education", and "Special Education".  When a student is working with a computer, they can take the time to write, edit, and reedit information before putting written material out to the world in the forms of emails, Facebook, and blogs.  Students with hearing disabilities can communicate with their hearing peers through texting.  This levels the playing field, since students do not need an interpreter to be the intermediaries between their friends and themselves.  The  student with a hearing disability can chat and have a private conversation without an adult listening in.  That is leveling the playing field.  Students with hearing disabilities can learn to make videos, chat, and almost anything else the world throws at them,  The time and effort they put into learning the skill might be more than a "general education" student, but it can be done.  Computers can bring the hearing and deaf in line with each other and can empower the deaf child.

                                          • Re: Intel Teach Live May 2012 - Adaptive Technology
                                            deafteach

                                            I work with hearing impaired middle school and high school students.  The students I work with are mainstreamed into hearing classrooms, and technology is one way to get that gap between "General Education", and "Special Education".  When a student is working with a computer, they can take the time to write, edit, and reedit information before putting written material out to the world in the forms of emails, Facebook, and blogs.  Students with hearing disabilities can communicate with their hearing peers through texting.  This levels the playing field, since students do not need an interpreter to be the intermediaries between their friends and themselves.  The  student with a hearing disability can chat and have a private conversation without an adult listening in.  That is leveling the playing field.  Students with hearing disabilities can learn to make videos, chat, and almost anything else the world throws at them,  The time and effort they put into learning the skill might be more than a "general education" student, but it can be done.  Computers can bring the hearing and deaf in line with each other and can empower the deaf child.

                                            • Re: Intel Teach Live May 2012 - Adaptive Technology

                                              I am a PE teacher and work with all groups of kids. Most of what my kids need in class are sites and apps they can go to review the health topics and math skills (I also tutor math). The iPad and the computer are great for this. They can work at their own speed; they can review as many times as they like; they like the way it teaches - usually in a game form, and they can compete with themselves. My kids use the myriad of math sites and apps (Tenmarks.com is a good one I discovered) , and I love Speed Bones and Speed anatomy for review. What so great is that no matter what level the student is on they can get help, review, go ahead. It is a great leveler.

                                              • Re: Intel Teach Live May 2012 - Adaptive Technology

                                                I teach elementary PE.  My students have used the iPad to learn about their bones, muscles, lungs, and heart.  I have used the iPad and computer to show slide show/power point of stretches for students to participate in.  The iPad has been a useful timer during game play.  I have also used the timer on the iPad with indiviual students who need a "heads-up" of when class will be over, and during time out period.  I have asked students who can not participate in PE due to medical reasons to look up opportunities for physical activity around the Austin area.

                                                • Re: Intel Teach Live May 2012 - Adaptive Technology
                                                  mdconley57

                                                  We've drawn our winner! The recipient of the Flipside Camera and tripod is mbowman@usd402.com! Congratulations - I will follow up with you via email with information on receiving your prize. Thanks to all who participated!