2 Replies Latest reply on Jun 27, 2012 11:55 AM by glen_w

    Simulations and Science Assessment - What's in store and how are you preparing?

    mdconley57

      Hat tip to glen_w for this article on the use of simulations on the latest science NAEP tests and the future of assessment. Our STEM myths discussion is leaning in the direction of next generation online assessments too, so that begs the question: What is going on in your states/districts/schools to prepare for the online tests that will roll out to assess the Common Core? While science is not part of the Common Core, the math assessments will have more complex, hands-on requirements than students who have taken only paper-pencil tests are accustomed to addressing.

       

      • Is your state/district/school using any sort of online assessment? If so, what? If not, what is preventing progress towards this?

       

      • What PD will teachers need to implement more rigorous online assessments, such as the science sims described in the article linked above?

       

      • What preparation will students need to be able to test successfully in this new format?
        • Re: Simulations and Science Assessment - What's in store and how are you preparing?

          I do not know what Austin ISD's plans are in this area. I do know that 15 or so years ago, my district included a hands-on requirement for one of the science benchmark tests. They quickly abandoned the practice, I assume because it was difficult to grade in a standardized way.

           

          We now have a new standardized test (the STAAR test) and I have heard that, at least in the upper grades, it will make the move to an online format. Don't know about any hands-on component.

          • Re: Simulations and Science Assessment - What's in store and how are you preparing?
            glen_w

            Utah uses "technology enhanced items" on our state science tests. These items are basically a simulation of some science principle or experiment. Students demonstrate understanding by how they manipulate the materials in the simulation.

             

            The demo for teachers and students begins by showing a model roller coaster. A video of a real roller coaster ride is then shown (on the same track). Students are again shown the roller coaster track "model" and asked to click on the point where "kinetic energy" is greatest. (A variation of the question asks where the "potential energy" is greatest. There are many clickable points and I believe the question is scored based on proximity to the most correct location.