12 Replies Latest reply on Nov 8, 2009 4:16 PM by Bonnie Feather

    Goomoodleikiog

    glen_w

      Perhaps you, like me, have read and considered the power behind Wikis 101, Blogging 101, as well as What's all the hype about Web 2.0?. Or, maybe you have considered all of the suggestions about Best Tech Tools for the Classroom are and Is the world going Web 2.0?. It seems that recent discussions on Teachers Engage have been lively and provided great ideas on how we as teachers can use web 2.0 tools with our students. Several trainers have done an excellent job of helping explain how we can benefit students (and ourselves) using web 2.0. I thought I had a handle on this and have enjoyed my attempts to be involved myself as well as having my students participate.

       

      As I was trying to gain "converts to Web 2.0 tools," I used the CommonCraft Show videos. As a result, I had a couple of teachers who were "adamant" about not being involved in using web 2.0 tools. As a result of watching these videos, the teachers were impressed and became excited to use these tools with their students. I just watched a "CommonCraft inspired video" that shows what happens when you do the math of Web 2.0 tools: Google + Moodle+ Wiki + Blog= "Goomoodlekiog". I thought I understood what a mashup was. I've created several mashups and was pleased with my results.

       

      When I watched the "Goomoodlekiog" video I determined the mashup concept had risen to a new height. In addition, I realized the power can come fromnot having students move from one level of Web 2.0 tool up to the next, but in finding a way to combine ideas and push learning to new limits.

       

       

      This video has me now reconsidering if Are you a 2.0 teacher?. While I thought I had a feeling for this concept, I am now thinking I have much farther to go. My goal now is to try to determine how I can help my students extend their learning and understanding farther than they have before. I hope to help them decide on ways to create and share content content understanding in new ways. Perhaps I just need some more Gadgets? so I can have fun in my classroom. And speaking of new gadgets, I bit the bullet and added a Snowball microphone to my tools today - it's supposed to be one of the best in its price range for creating podcasts. Now I've got to apply what we learned in Podcasting 101!

       

      Please share your ideas on how we can encourage teachers to involve their students in a GooMoodleikiog. I'd also like to see any mashups that my fellow trainers help create.

        • Re: Goomoodleikiog

          Glen,

           

          Thanks for sharing this video. I often feel overwhelmed with the 2.0 world. It seems I have to stay one step ahead of the teachers I train, but find myself trying to do too much at one time. Do you think it is best for teachers to start slow and build up? Seems like if you throw so much at them they think they are supposed to use it all at one time.

            • Re: Goomoodleikiog
              glen_w

              Jill,

               

              I agree that if a trainer is NOT careful, it is easy to overwhelm participant teachers. I try in my workshops to not throw everything at teachers as fast as I can. (This may seem strange if you follow me on Twitter as I sometimes open up a fire hose of information ). In my opinion, it is far more important that teachers be comfortable and willing to accept and use web 2.0 tools than that the learn all of the tools available to them. I find the best results happen when teachers use and are comfortable with one or two tools and implement them with students.

                • Re: Goomoodleikiog

                  Glen,

                   

                  You can't help the fact that you are a wealth of information

                  What do you think are the most important tools to start them with (other than the Intel tools)? If they do not see a way to use it across the curriculum and grade levels or to cover curriculum standards, they will not use it.

                    • Re: Goomoodleikiog
                      glen_w

                      Obviously the first online tools I like to share with teachers are those of TWT! That said, I think Google Docs comes in a close second. This past year, I showed this to five VERY experienced technology using teachers in my district. NONE had used Google Docs before. The district technology supervisor informed me later that I "let Pandora out of her box!" As we discussed it, he said he watched the lights come on in these teacher's eyes as they considered not only how they could use Google Docs, but how their students would benefit from the tool. I smiled at him and asked to have a greater bandwidth delivered to my school next year . The next tool I'd recommend would be the use of a blog. I found in sharing what we did in class via a blog that students who were absent came back more prepared for class. Many talked about how the blog entry provided information on not only what the assignment was, but the links helped them understand the material better. (On a side note, I was pleased that NO student in either grade 7 or 9 failed the second semester this year. I do not take credit for this as I had two amazing student teachers who worked with me and my students.)

                        • Re: Goomoodleikiog

                          I totally agree with you on the tools (GoogleDocs, and Blogs) We have BlackBoard for our region and you would be surprised at the teachers who actually request to use it.

                          You surely can take credit. You are an amazing teacher. You inspire me. With all of your technology experience and training, you could surely leave the classroom, yet you stay in order to benefit your students.

                            • Re: Goomoodleikiog
                              glen_w

                              There may be something in the love and passion of a teacher. I just read the article "Are they unteachable?" This article in my opinion defines how and why some teachers gravitate to finding ways to help students succeed. Below I have quoted three paragraphs from the end of the article. I think this is something we should help ALL new teachers understand. (I know I'll be reviewing it with the new science teachers in my district this year.)

                               

                               

                              “Star teachers believe that, regardless of the life conditions their students face, they as teachers bear a primary responsibility for sparking their students’ desire to learn,” Haberman said.


                              “They do not wear down easily nor do they blame the students and their inadequacies,” he said. “Rather, they assume responsibility for doing more. They believe that success is a result of persistence and effort and that students have great potential if given ample motivation and opportunity.”


                              When teachers argue they can’t overcome a student’s background, they underestimate their power to change lives and they shortchange their profession. If childhood poverty were destiny, we’d have a lot fewer doctors, teachers and lawyers today. Children whose backgrounds would predict only failure achieve every day in Georgia because of smart, inventive and dedicated teachers.



                    • Re: Goomoodleikiog

                      Glen i just tried  http://www.commoncraft.com/ link and find it very amazing and help guide my math teachers during PBL designing. They dont see how math could be used in our daily life when doing Teach Essentials by showing them these videos they will see the PBL implementation in math. I am going to forward the link to my math Master teachers.

                      Thank you!!

                      • Re: Goomoodleikiog
                        NaomiHarm

                        I will be using the Goomoodleikiog video to launch my new workshop titled: Transforming Education with 21st Century Skills and ICT Literacies.  I think in order for administrators and educators to get the big picture of what 21st century skills are and its teaching and learning environment they need to be immersed with the effective tools that support their curriculum and content.  So many times teachers are lost or even dumbfounded of how to improve their instruction with the infusion of the appropriate technology tools to enhance their own instruction.

                         

                        On new tool I just came across is the Atomic Learning ebook on 21st Century Skills.  It provides a brief overview of critical information to get everyone on the same page relating to common terminology, 21st century skills, and standards.  Sometimes these small "bits" of information are much more palatable to introduce to provide the big picture of a more complex subject matter.  Take a look and see what you think about the ebook which is attached.

                         

                        Naomi Harm

                        • Re: Goomoodleikiog
                          Bonnie Feather

                          What I like BEST about this concept is the emphasis on making teaching tasks EASIER and FASTER for teachers and students.  When I am showing new tools to teachers because I think they are fun and cool, they like the idea, but are hesitant to put in the time to learn how to use them.  Yes, yes, you and I know they are time savers and that even the up front learning curve nowadays is short.  But many teachers are having a hard time keeping up with the changes in the web (That's the second time in 2 days I've heard the term "read-write web") and contemplating use of them in their classrooms.

                           

                          I, too will be using this video in my trainings!

                           

                          Thanks, Glen!

                           

                          ~Bonnie