30 Replies Latest reply on Oct 1, 2012 10:11 AM by glen_w

    Hands-on v.s. Lecture...Ding Ding

      In a "learning fight" which would win, the hands- on learning or the lecturing? Most people retain information by doing not by reading or being lectured to. Doing hands on activities in the classroom might make it more fun for the students to learn the lessons and remember what they learned down the road. So get your students up and moving around! http://edudemic.com/2012/07/the-movement-toward-movement-emerging-trend-gets-students-off-their-butts/

        • Re: Hands-on v.s. Lecture...Ding Ding
          cgardne

          I so agree. I'm not a lecture fan and in the area of science, how can one really retain information if the instructor just lectures or just models or demonstrates a lab.  Students need that hands-on opportunity to further create excitement and further interest.

            • Re: Hands-on v.s. Lecture...Ding Ding

              I agree. With lecturing, I feel the words on in one ear and out the other for some students. Hands-on activities will make the material stick and interest students in wanting to learn more about the subject. Also, there are different types of learning and only practicing auditory learning won't help the students who learn differently.

            • Re: Hands-on v.s. Lecture...Ding Ding

              I think in some cases it's important to get the information first by either listening to a lecture or reading from a printed source. From there, it's important to utilize that hands on learning so students can apply their knowledge. However, some lessons are better if students get the materials first, do the hands on process, and then read and document results of hands on combined with oral or printed knowledge. It's good to mix it up to keep learning interesting and will meet the needs of all types of learners in your classroom.

              • Re: Hands-on v.s. Lecture...Ding Ding
                glen_w

                What a great article to have shared. I agree that students need to be moving (so true in my Middle School classroom.) I try to change the activity we do about every 15 minutes. I have students constantly ask me "why is our science class shorter than ..." and they fill in the name of a different class they take. Despite my best efforts to explain that all classes are the same length, these students are convinced my class is cut short by more than ten minutes each day.

                 

                While I can learn by listening to a lecture or reading an article or book, I retain information so much better when I do something in the learning process. I'm confident that mountain biking would not be much fun if all I did was read about it .

                • Re: Hands-on v.s. Lecture...Ding Ding

                  I do think classrooms should appeal to a student's visual and kinesthetic learning abilities. I don't think sitting in a classroom being lectured at completes teachers goals of trying to get students to comprehend all of the information being taught. I think getting more student involvement promotes a better atmosphere of learning and drives students to more success.

                  • Re: Hands-on v.s. Lecture...Ding Ding

                    Hello Melissa,

                     

                    I agree with you 100%. Children need to be active and learning using the hands-on method. In college, I remember I learned more in labs than I did in lecture. Sitting and listening to a teacher all day long is boring. Students need to be able to learn more and experience more while learning hand-on. Reading in science about how crystals are formed is interesting, yeah, but actually making crystals yourself is fun. It only takes a few supplies but the students will have so much fun watching their crystals grow.

                    • Re: Hands-on v.s. Lecture...Ding Ding


                      definitely, hands-on! students learn more by it.

                      • Re: Hands-on v.s. Lecture...Ding Ding

                        I think often times you have to have some of the lecture qualities to your lesson. However, hands on activities have been proven to teach and help students retain information better. In my opinion, its not a matter of one of the other but using both more effectively.

                        • Re: Hands-on v.s. Lecture...Ding Ding

                          Lecturing can often times bore students causing them to not attain the knowledge that needs to be learned in the classroom. Teachers should incorporate hands on activities into their lectures. Have some lecturing but add hands on activities to help students get first hand experiences so they can more easily absorb what's being taught. 

                          • Re: Hands-on v.s. Lecture...Ding Ding

                            Hands-On activities is a best way for students to learn in class. As they are doing activities about the subject in class they are learning by themselves and the teacher can be giving information as well during this process. Just giving a detail lecture can not always be the solution to teaching. Modern world today students are easily distracted with the technology we have. Instead of paying attention in class the rather text or if laptops are allowed they rather be on the web. If the students participate in hands-on activites they will be doing something constructive and have more chances of learning the topic of the day.

                            • Re: Hands-on v.s. Lecture...Ding Ding
                              JulieSzaj

                              Personally I learn MUCH better from hands-on experience. With that being said, my husband is a total auditory learner-and gets frustrated if he is made "to do" instead of just listen. I strongly believe that teachers should give their students a learning inventory at the beginning of each school year to find out how each student learns the best. From there the teacher has the information needed to tailor lessons to meet all learner needs.

                              • Re: Hands-on v.s. Lecture...Ding Ding

                                I am always an advocate for hands on learning because it allows active involvement between the teacher and students. Doing all hands on lessons though may not always be the best result because students may become too focused on the creativity aspect and not get the true meaning behind the lesson. It is always important to keep a balance between hands on and lecturing to make sure active learning is going on.

                                 

                                Shanice Foye

                                  • Re: Hands-on v.s. Lecture...Ding Ding

                                    I believe hands on learning benefits each and every individual in their own way. As for me hands on is one of the best ways I learn and retain and recall the information later on down the road. Each and every student learns in their own unique and special way. When making a lesson plan you need to have a variety so it a) caters to other students needs b) causes a "switch" in teaching which then can engage or re-engage students who may have "lost" interest and c) keep it fun. I would love to see more hands on activities taking place in the classroom. I will use them in my own classroom.

                                  • Re: Hands-on v.s. Lecture...Ding Ding

                                    I think a hands on an activity can be very effective if done in a way that allows the students to retain information, i know for me when i learn best when i get to do activities that involve me moving around and collaborating with my classmates. However there have been times where the activity had a lot of aspects that weren't necessarily fitting for the lesson and there have been times where i was so intrigued by activity that i didn't retain the lesson.

                                    • Re: Hands-on v.s. Lecture...Ding Ding

                                      I think both hands on learning and l is the way to go, not only do the students get the lecture aspect but also the secondary hands on. The students would get the lecture aspect of things because teachers would have to explain the directions of the hands on activity and the activity would reinforce the lecture and help the kids that were hands on learners. Every person has their own style of learning and by covering the lecture aspect and then reinforcing it with a hands on activity the kids would really understand the material.

                                      • Re: Hands-on v.s. Lecture...Ding Ding

                                        As a current college student I find both lecture and hands on learning to be important. I think there is a time and place for each and that in many cases utilizing both to teach the same material is most beneficial. Allowing students to see the material presented in numerous forms helps them to retain not only the facts but how the knowledge can be useful to them later in life. Student's do not all learn the same way, that much is obvious, but by appealing to as many different types of learners in one lesson, the chances of retention are much greater.

                                          • Re: Hands-on v.s. Lecture...Ding Ding
                                            glen_w

                                            Student engagement is a big challenge when working with Middle School students. I find the attention span of a 12 year old is generally less than ten minutes. I have found that lectures for over ten minutes causes my students to quickly losing interest. Mixing up direct instruction with hands-on activities leads to having more students engaged in their learning.

                                          • Re: Hands-on v.s. Lecture...Ding Ding

                                            I agree completely. Sitting in four or more class a day just listening to your teacher talk can be very boring. Hands-on not only teaches the students the lesson but it also has their attention so that the teacher knows the children are learning. From my experience I believe having hands on learning was easier for me to learn the lesson rather than just listening to my teacher talk. The teacher could also incorporate both hands on and lecturing within a lesson.

                                              • Re: Hands-on v.s. Lecture...Ding Ding
                                                glen_w

                                                I think one example of hands-on learning benefiting students more than a lecture would be measuring. I'm confident that most young people can read about measuring and may comprehend how it is done. I, however, am more confident students understand measuring when they must demonstrate the measuring process.

                                                 

                                                Look closely at this image of a graduated cylinder.

                                                Graduated_Cylinder.png

                                                • What volume would you say is in the graduated cylinder? (use a decimal if it is more accurate.)
                                                • What errors in might a student make in reading this volume?
                                                • How might practicing help students reduce errors in measurement?
                                                • Re: Hands-on v.s. Lecture...Ding Ding

                                                  I agree, even if it means throwing in a video (a different source than lecture) wakes up our 21st C students.

                                                • Re: Hands-on v.s. Lecture...Ding Ding

                                                  I enjoy hands on much better than a lecture.  Although, I think repition is key, so having both would be a plus.  I think hands on activities stick with you better and are easier to remember over a lecture, especially if the teacher is monotone.  It also helps with social skills!

                                                  lamooney91

                                                  • Re: Hands-on v.s. Lecture...Ding Ding

                                                     

                                                    I am a huge fan of hands on learning.  I know for me that I learn much better when I am actually engaged in what I am learning.  Hands on learning also is a good way to keep the students’ attention because they are always doing something.  Also, a lot of times when students are doing some type of hands on learning, they do not realize they are actually learning because they are having fun doing the activity.  I have been told that after a certain time period, students start to loose interest during a lecture.  With hands on learning, students hopefully will not have that problem.

                                                    • Re: Hands-on v.s. Lecture...Ding Ding

                                                      In my opinion hands-on learning is a better approach. I think it has the better ability to engage the students and keep their attention. Hands-on offers a more exciting approach to teaching and learning that I believe leads to more knowledge being learned. As a college student, I am very familiar with the lecture classroom structures and it can be extremely hard to stay focused in these types of settings. However, if a teacher/instructor were to engage the students with more of a hands-on approach students will then be able to hold their attention to the information longer because they are interacting instead of solely taking-in information.

                                                      • Re: Hands-on v.s. Lecture...Ding Ding
                                                        dougemints

                                                        Ten years ago I worked with an elementary SS teacher that liked to lecture.  She had the podium in her class, pages of notes, and a textbook.  The routine was for kids to read the assigned chapter, listen to her lecture, and record the notes.  Then, they were tested on that chapter and the process started all over again.

                                                         

                                                        She was always complaining that the kids came to class unprepared and she couldn't get even the most motivated kids to participate in lecture responses because none knew the material. Kids were failing the class and she was getting mad at her students instead of feeling a "connection" with them.

                                                         

                                                        She stewed about it, but then completely changed her methods to a more student-centered structure the next year.  The kids still had to read the chapter, but not because it was the content of the upcoming lecture it was an essential element to what the kids were to do next.

                                                         

                                                        The teacher started sitting in the back of the room and stopped lecturing. The students worked in teams with appointed note-takers to propose what they thought were the most important points in the readings.  The class would vote, sort, and organize their ideas.  They were the ones that decided what needed to be studied and what people needed to know about each topic.

                                                         

                                                        The class used an interactive whiteboard and concept mapping software to include the team's decisions into a master class set of important points which then served as their summary and study guides for each chapter. Since the students were manipulating the content fully, they were able to discuss the material with each other and with adults anywhere in the school.  They became experts and perfected the skills for obtaining information because they had to.

                                                         

                                                        If the teacher felt an important point was being overlooked, she would suggest through a student team to get her idea included.

                                                         

                                                        The test remained the same between the two methods, but the student testing results went through the roof and even showed up significantly on her end of year, state exam.

                                                         

                                                        She now works in her district showing others how to modernize instruction.  Just a simple twist on the same content, but removing the lecture made a huge difference.  (and I got to watch it happen:)