6 Replies Latest reply on May 21, 2009 11:31 AM by dbeard0217

    Using Seeing Reason

    Bonnie Feather

      Our group abandoned the Module 8 format in the TwT MT course.  Instead of working just with pairs, we each showcased our practice prompt, assigned the group to work in teams to use our maps, then practiced asking the effective questioning techniques.  We helped each other to look for Best Practices with the tool.

       

      How did this experience affect your understanding of the tool and its best uses in the classroom as well as in a training situation?

        • Re: Using Seeing Reason

          How did this experience affect your understanding of the tool and its best uses in the classroom as well as in a training situation?

           

          This experience made me aware of the importance of creating a very specific prompt for my students.  It also helped me to see how to create an activity so that the "increase / decrease" portion of the tool would be appropriate.  I think this is one area I need to refine in my own SR activity.  By viewing others' activities, I was better able to understand where my own may be lacking and what to revise before I present this to a class of students.  While I do not think we necessarily had to practice everyone's ativity, I do think that going through the motions for 2 or 3 of them was valuable not only to myself but to the person who created that tool to see how it would actually function once it had been implemented.

          • Re: Using Seeing Reason

            Having this discussion dramatically improved both of my view of how to incorporate the activity in my own unit but also helped to identify best practices for how to best use the tool. Through collaborative discussion, my classmates helped me see better ways to frame my question prompt, which may be one of the most important factors in effective use of this tool.

            • Re: Using Seeing Reason

              The practice map only led me to a "What do the buttons do in the tool" understanding of the SRT. But we were discovering that we didn't understand HOW the tool could be used. As a result, some of us felt like we were forcing an activity into a tool that didn't quite fit.

               

              However, after a pair of MT's showed their use of the SRT, we discovered that the prompt for the activity was the crux for success. Changing the verbiage ahead of time weeded out any misconceptions. After that, we then were able to show our uses of the tools and have our peers pretend to be students.

               

              With that, we were able to have them find the errors in our usage. It might be a typo. It might be we gave too many parameters limiting free thinking. It might be that with a little rethinking or rewording, we had a great use for this tool. And then could see the benefits of using this tool in the unit and in our classroom!

               

              Personally, I was able to streamline how I would've set my activity up so that I allowed more for free thinking leading to deeper thinking. I also discovered that having groups pause after a short time to show and reflect on their map with others allows them to decide if they like the direction they're moving in or if their gorup needs to change/modify/tweak.

               

               

              Well played, Bonnie!

              • Re: Using Seeing Reason

                Reviewing in this manner was extremely benificial to me because it gave me a chance to look at several examples and see how small changes in the wording of a prompt can make the tool much easier to use.  Many of us used a main factor that wouldn't work well when we tried using it to show relationships.  For example: when we changed the word neighborhood to the quality of life in my neighborhood, that made a big difference in how the relationships were being built.  We also had great discussions about how each map is a reflection of the students in that group and that it is more about the conversations and thinking that is happening than the actual end product.

                • Re: Using Seeing Reason

                  How did this experience affect your understanding of the tool and its best uses in the classroom as well as in a training situation?

                   

                  Through whole group discussion and conversation of each of the units, I discovered several different uses of the Seeing Reason tool.  I also thought that the conversation about prompts pushed me to bring my prompt to a higher level of thinking without limiting the outcome of what students would develop when using the tool.

                  • Re: Using Seeing Reason

                    This tool has some powerful features and some drawbacks. It is great for having students explain and to justify their decisions. It really can cause studednts to hit the higher levels on Bloom's. It can allow students to be creative in their approach.

                     

                    The seeing reason tool is definately one that you have to work around in some areas. It requires a lot of adjustment in the language in order to show relationships isnstead of allowing students to use normal language.  I can see this being perfect some environments and some approaches, but very difficult for those that do not have a mastery of the English Language.

                     

                    I will work hard to help my participants understand the ins and outs of this tool.