3 Replies Latest reply on Oct 5, 2009 6:03 PM by MrsSmoke

    It is a little Kooky- but interesting...The Global Student

      I am reading Maya Frost's book the global student. She and her husband pull their daughters out of  highschool- and move them overseas (all over in fact) to give them a global education. She and her husband can earn a living from anywhere (a key point she kinda glosses over) as long as they have computer, phone and internet. But some of her points were fascinating. Here is my favorite quote

       

       

      “Rigor can be useful, but only if we employ it as a way to elevate rather than denigrate. We need to resist getting locked into the standardized variety of rigor- and choose instead to promote high expectations for each individual and an enthusiasm for learning that sparks both industriousness and imagination” Maya Frost, the Global Student
        • Rigor
          Bonnie Feather

          Paige, thank you for your post.

           

          I am about to embark on a series of trainings in a local district on how to move lessons into the Quadrant D sector of the Rigor & Relevance framework through technology integration!  I will be using your quote.

           

          Can you recommend one link over another to find more information about Frost's "The Global Student?"  Then I won't have to search all over the web for the best reference!

           

          Bonnie

            • Re: Rigor

              You may want to order the book and look at it before you quote her in a training. Her ideas are pretty radical (kids dont need to go to US schools, apply for college etc- that you become a learner thru travel and life)....Search Maya Frost in Amazon and you can read a little more about her....

            • Re: It is a little Kooky- but interesting...The Global Student
              MrsSmoke

              This sounds similar to schools that run on sailboats or families to travel by bus from community to community for learning experiences.  I have to admit, there would be a great deal of adventure in those scenarios, but I'd be curious to know if the students are exploring more than social studies curriculum through these experiences.  I may have to check this one out.