1 Reply Latest reply on Jan 26, 2013 11:02 PM by lwenske

    Intel Education Weekly Resource Showcase - Visual Ranking Tool

    mdconley57

      To kickoff our weekly Resource Showcase and our eager anticipation of Digital Learning Day 2013, we're featuring the new and improved Visual Ranking Tool.

      The Visual Ranking Tool brings focus to the thinking behind making ordered lists. Students identify and refine criteria as they assign order or ranking to a list. Items in the list may be represented by images. Students must explain their reasoning and can compare their work with each other in a visual diagram. This tool supports activities where students need to organize ideas, debate differences, and reach consensus.


      Visit the Visual Ranking tool section of the Intel Education website to get an overview of the tool, try it out, find examples on how you can engage your students using the tool, learn effective instructional strategies from fellow educators, and much more.


      Have you used the tool? If so, tell us how and share an example lesson or activity that leverages it.

      http://www.intel.com/content/dam/www/program/education/us/en/images/thinking-tools/visual-ranking/screenshots/visual-ranking-overview-3x2.pnghttp://www.intel.com/content/dam/www/program/education/us/en/images/thinking-tools/visual-ranking/screenshots/visual-ranking-overview-3x2.png

        • Re: Intel Education Weekly Resource Showcase - Visual Ranking Tool
          lwenske

          i haven't used this, yet, with a class or a group, but i do REALLY like it.  after exploring the provided links and viewing the examples and project ideas, i am trying to figure out how i can best use this with my first grade class.  i'm thinking of considering ideas of what's most important in our character traits that we discuss as a school or comparing our school/class rules and ranking what's most important and why.  of course, we could compare what we think about what's most important for humans/animals/plants to survive, what's most important about taking care of the earth, or what's the most important part of a story or in being a good friend and why, etc.  i'm trying to figure out how tough (or easy!) it would be to utilize this with first graders (or possibly with a professional cohort of teachers earning their National Board Certification within my district that i work with--as we could compare what's most important in being a good/great mentor or in helping candidates submit fabulous entries.  we could have groups compare their reasoning...).  so, this looks great.  i'll be back to add more if i successfully use it--but i LOVE it so far.