14 Replies Latest reply on Feb 19, 2010 9:10 PM by Bonnie Feather

    Are the Winter Olympics coming to your classroom?

    julesfischy

      Are the Winter Olympics coming to your classroom? February  12 – 28, 2010 the Winter Olympics are taking place in Vancouver, Canada. 

       

      Have you explored the games site - Vancouver 2010 or the Educational Programs that even has a Teacher  Resources Index with lessons in English and French? NBC Vancouver 2010 has athlete and team  profiles  and when the games begin will  have the latest results and schedules, including medal count. NBC has taken  things a step further this year and if you go to NBC Learn you can watch the  16 part series on the Science of the Olympic  Winter Games

       

      So what are you doing in your classroom?  Anyone have a project planed with one of the  Thinking Tools?

        • Re: Are the Winter Olympics coming to your classroom?
          NaomiHarm

          Thinkfinity has done a really nice job with creating an online portal of 2010 Olympic lessons and resources to implement into your classroom

           

          LET THE GAMES BEGIN!

          http://www.thinkfinity.org/winter_olympics_2010.aspx

          1 of 1 people found this helpful
          • Re: Are the Winter Olympics coming to your classroom?
            glen_w

            Because of how carefully defined my core is, I've got to look hard to find how I can incorporate the Olympics in what I teach. I'm excited about the Olympics - especially since Noelle Picus-Pace is a former student of mine! I'm sure I'll have to record her event if I've got classes at the time - she is a very kind lady.

            • Re: Are the Winter Olympics coming to your classroom?
              julesfischy

              We are watching the games and having fun.  My daughter is also researching in school and the kids are creating polls to find out what is the favorite sport of the winter olympics answhat sport was watched them most.  What was interesting to me is that my son had so many questions about the luge - that he grabed the computer and within 10 minutes he had found the answers he wanted and it made watching the sport that much more intersting.  I know how fast one can get information today- but when it happens I am still amazed.

              • Re: Are the Winter Olympics coming to your classroom?
                blancaedu

                In an English class I'm working with, each student researched one Olympic medal hopeful. After collecting information from several sites (already mentioned), students had to give their opinion on whether they thought their Olympian would win a medal or not and comment using a Blog. Other students gave feedback on whether they agreed or not (each student also had a partner who researched a similar athlete).

                 

                They are watching the games this week to see if their predictions come true. It's always a nice touch when you give students a project that involves global events - especially the Olympics. It's a memory I would imagine many will remember for a lifetime. An added component could be asking students to rank what attributes they  believe to have the biggest effect on the win - I'll add that to the lesson when they come back.

                 

                Julia, it's definitely newsworthy when events begin to include a teaching/learning component. I'll be sure to check the Teacher Resource Index - thanks!

                • Re: Are the Winter Olympics coming to your classroom?
                  glen_w

                  My student teacher used the National Science Foundation "Science of the Winter Games" as part of today's lesson. Students were learning about how body systems help living organisms survive. This short video explains how cross-country skiers are tested for oxygen use during their training. After the video, several students blurted out "that's why they fall over and crash at the end of their race!" I think when students see relationships of what they are learning to real life - they enjoy and internalize what was learned.

                    • Physics of Olympics
                      Bonnie Feather

                      I am not a physics teacher, but I see some real opportunities for using the Promethean Board during the Olympics to illustrate some concepts.  Geometry is another area that could be illustrated using the Promethean Board and the tools included in the software.

                       

                      I imagine projecting a skier or skater's trajectory (snowboarder, etc)  on the board and stopping the action.  Then I would use the pen tool and get out the protractor tool.  One could measure angles and so forth with the math tools.

                       

                      Many of the same tools are available as an extension of the SMART Board software.

                       

                      Any math teachers out there who could be more specific with some ideas?

                        • Re: Physics of Olympics
                          glen_w

                          I had a great discussion with a physical science teacher this week. We were trying to determine how his Promethean ActivBoard could be used to determine the height of Shaun White's snowboarding runs. Each time we tried to pause the video, the students complained. They came into the classroom before school and saw what we were doing. They would NOT let us stop the snowboarding video - even in the name of science. Our ROUGH estimate of the height of his first run seems much too large. We think this is probably due to angles of the 10 meter distance in the halfpipe compared to the angle Shaun is above the edge of the halfpipe. I've attached a screenshot of our efforts. Our ruler showed a distance of 30 mm on the 10 meter distance. You can see this same ruler shows a height of about 117 mm when Shaun is at his highest. I am confident the announcer was more accurate when he said 20 feet above the ground - but our students saw how measurements can be done frozen video frame.

                            • Re: Physics of Olympics
                              Bonnie Feather

                              Very cool!  In science, every problem is just anothe learning opportunity!  Of course, the camera angle comes into play as well...not sure quite how to compensate for that unless NBC will provide teachers with that information.

                               

                              I haven't looked at the NBC site yet, but wouldn't it be cool if they would provide lesson ideas for teachers- based on recommendations or resources created ahead of time and during the Olympic events by Master Teachers...  sounds like a job for the Intel-trained "Inspiring Educators!"

                        • Re: Are the Winter Olympics coming to your classroom?
                          glen_w

                          I had an exciting moment today when I stopped by a peer's classroom. His science class was learning about forces that interact with moving objects. After the main portion of the lesson, he brought up the NBC Olympic page. Videos were shown to the class and they discussed the forces involved in that specific sport. It was interesting for me to see how many students successfully identified the forces involved in each sport. Students seemed excited to explain how and why an event, they watched yesterday, had some unique event occur. I liked how the Olympics focused student attention in learning the details taught in their lesson. (Perhaps one of my highlights from this lesson is the fact it was taught by a fellow Intel Teach participant teacher!)

                          • Re: Are the Winter Olympics coming to your classroom?

                            I have posted this information in another Engage group but thought I'd share it here, thanks to Julia.

                             

                            We might as well take advantage of the 2010 Olympics (and all of them!) for class activities, so here is my initial offering. Please feel free to add to this list of materials as you find them. There are some hot lists you can download at my Louisiana Region VI TLTC site at the following location: http://www.rapides.k12.la.us/region6tltc/index.htm, and here is a new candidate for inclusion: http://www.everydayteaching.com/Holiday/olympic_rsrc.html.

                            • Olympic scratchers
                              Bonnie Feather

                              Many students these days enjoy playing with video games.  What would be more educational as well as more fun?  ...making their own video games!  And with Scratch, students could create a video game which uses embedded math concepts (think of those random numbers!) to illustrate their favorite Olympic sport!

                               

                              I am encouraging my PTs and MTs to develop Unit Plans which use Scratch (a kid-friendly programming application) and this sounds like a great match.

                               

                              Has anyone out there seen Unit Plans built around students using Scratch?