1 Reply Latest reply on Mar 15, 2014 7:40 PM by glen_w

    STEM snacks – Celebrating π Day

    glen_w

      http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d4/Pi_pie2.jpgThis week many of my math teaching friends will help their students celebrate Pi day. The math teachers in my building plan to bring pies to their classrooms. I've wondered how many of in the Engage community also plan on celebrating this mathematical day on 3/14. Perhaps like me, you see March 14 as an opportunity to celebrate Albert Einstein's birth. In my opinion, the brilliant mind of this physicist did much to further what is now STEM education.

       

       

      http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/66/Einstein_1921_by_F_Schmutzer.jpg/456px-Einstein_1921_by_F_Schmutzer.jpgI've been considering how my students can explore Einstein's contributions to scientific knowledge. I do not want to go too deeply into his studies – as a middle school child will not comprehend them. I'm considering an activity related to either electromagnetism or gravity. These two topics seem “less deep” compared to other areas Einstein studied.

       

      Please share how you and your students will celebrate March 14 with the community:

      1. What activities are you doing on March 14?
      2. How are you preparing students to comprehend STEM in their world?

       

      I look forward to ideas that can interest and engage the middle school student!

        • Re: STEM snacks – Celebrating π Day
          glen_w

          An update from my school. The math department had pie for students (and the students learned to do the math for a circle.) Our PTSA parents brought in pies and served them to teachers at lunch. The media center held a special "guy's read" activity with Brandon Mull talking about his new novel Five Kingdoms. He autographed books for the boys and encouraged them to read more. All who participated then got their own individually wrapped mini pie from the librarian. In science, students collected data and discussed how they thought Einstein would have interpreted their lab results.

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