18 Replies Latest reply on Apr 27, 2010 3:23 AM by coxd

    Free Video Resources

      One of the instructional technology items that I am always interested in locating is the free video resource. I enjoy using these resources with teachers but more so like to give the resources to teachers. Couple this kind of resource with the current need for and emphasis on effective STEM resources, and you have a truly popular AND highly useful resource!

       

      My contribution today is Athena Web. This site is maintained by a European-based organization and offers free videos and information suitable for grades 4 through 12, university, and beyond since professional scientists contribute and use the varied content. Check out the site, and then please give me some feedback on how you can use this with your classes or with teachers whom you facilitate for primary resources.

       

      Thinkfinity's Science NetLinks partner has some free resources which are also of high quality as does Brain Pop although BrainPop is usually thought of as a commercial resource only. Can you suggest suggest some other free resources like these to share with our Engage family?

        • Re: Free Video Resources

          David, I just checked out the site. It looks pretty good. I also like the Links section that gives resources for further research. I will be sharing this site with my teachers in the Region. They are always looking for "free" video resources. I also like to tell them about the video resources on the LPB Cyberchannel home page. Many of the sites have free video clips.

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            • Re: Free Video Resources

              Thank you both for sharing the links to the videos and interactive resources.

               

              Those are some excellent teacher tools, as I am sure you already know. Thanks for sharing.

              • Re: Free Video Resources

                Hey Nan:

                 

                Yes, ma`am, this is a decent site with quality materials. I can see lots of teachers--especially STEM subjects right now--taking advantage of these free videos for use with their classes. As long as the videos are used correctly,they can as you know be a great supplementary resource for savvy teachers.

                 

                And it's funny that you mention the CyberChannel as I use it but always forget about the many free video and other resources available there. Thanks for reminding me!

              • Re: Free Video Resources

                Another resource to add to this list is WatchKnow. This site combines videos from a variety of sources and organizes them by grade level. The site contains many how to videos for things such as long division, etc. I think it is worth a look.

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                • Re: Free Video Resources
                  shanmangin

                  Thanks for sharing these resources!  I haven't been to these sites before.  Here are some others that work well for elementary grades:

                   

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                  • Re: Free Video Resources
                    glen_w

                    I like the videos on Science.TV. This FREE resource is designed for schools in the UK. Their idea is to help students see video as a tool for learning (not viewing the product as a final teaching tool.)

                    • Re: Free Video Resources

                      Also, I just have to share this resource of free videos--free only till April 30. Pass this one on to your people. Here's the advertising I saw.

                       

                      Alexander Street Press is offering a "sneak peek" look at its American History in Video online collection. Since launching last April, American History in Video has grown to include more than 4,000 titles and 1,000 hours. It will continue to grow to include more than 5,000 titles and 2,000 hours of newsreels and documentaries from produces such as PBS, The History Channel, Bullfrog Films, Media rich Learning, and California Newsreel. So far, I have had no requests to purchase.

                      • iTunesU
                        Bonnie Feather

                        Oh, goody!  I have something to contribute that's not here yet!

                         

                        iTunesU is an area which provides free audio and video content for all kinds of uses.  There's a particular area for K12 education which is where we would probably head.  Many universities and colleges, high schools, and even elementary schools are posting their content here to share for FREE.  F-R-E-E, FREE!

                         

                        To check it out, open up your iTunes on your computer.  If you are on a windows-based computer, you may have to download it, but it is also free.

                        Find the link to iTunes Store.  In many districts, this area is blocked, but if you find it useful, talk with your IT folks and perhaps they will unblock it for teacher logins.  Most districts will keep it locked for student logins.  (More on this topic here...)

                         

                        Once you are in the iTunes store area, look for a link to iTunesU.  Once there, look for the link to iTunesU.  In that area, look for the K12 Education link.  Of course, you may want to explore an astrophysics course from MIT on your own, or recommend it to a student, but you will find lots of great video and audio there you will use in your teaching.

                         

                        If you put a topic in the iTunes search box, then sort the results by price, all the free iTunesU stuff will "rise to the top," making it easier than going through all these steps to find what you want.

                          • Re: iTunesU
                            glen_w

                            Bonnie brings up an excellent point. Besides iTunesU, I make use of the Podcast section of iTunes. I am currently subscribed to over 75 podcasts. The majority are on topics related to what I teach. From these podcasts I often find a short (under 5 minute) episode that I can use with my students. Generally the podcasts I share are directly related to what we are talking about for class that day. My students have come to expect the podcasts. I had one young lady come into class one day all excited. She asked me if she could suggest a podcast for us to enjoy - I reminded her I would need to preview it first. She agreed and gave me the name. It was a great podcast that was directly related to our unit. (I was excited because she did her research outside of school on this one!)

                             

                            So ... this brings me to the question. What One or Two podcasts do you like so much that you think I should add them to my library? (No they do not have to be science related!)

                            • Re: iTunesU

                              Bonnie:

                              You do a great job of explaining iTU. Thanks! Its functionality and versatlilty make this not just a great resource but a great and FREE resource for the most part although there are plenty of opportunities to spend money there.

                            • Re: Free Video Resources
                              shanmangin

                              I just used PBS Dragonfly TV with some science teachers in one of our districts http://pbskids.org/dragonflytv/

                               

                              They were studying external and internal stimuli and learned behaviors, and we found a fun video about African penguins- http://pbskids.org/dragonflytv/show/africanpenguins.html

                                • Re: Free Video Resources
                                  glen_w

                                  Shannon,

                                   

                                  Great minds think alike! I also use Dragonfly TV! I get mine through from iTunes Dragonfly TV . Podcast | PBS KIDS GO!. Some of my favorite episodes include the following:

                                  • Solar Cars
                                  • Otters
                                  • Earthquakes
                                  • Gecko Feet

                                   

                                  What other sites have videos that cause students to make inferences about what they observe?

                                  • Re: Free Video Resources

                                    Shannon:

                                     

                                    Let us not forget Teachers' Domain videos as well. To access the videos and the lesson plans and ancillary materials that go with them, you must register--but it's a free registration.  See http://www.teachersdomain.org/

                                     

                                    "Teachers' Domain is an extensive library of free digital media resources produced by public television, designed for classroom use and professional development."

                                      • Re: Free Video Resources
                                        glen_w

                                        David,

                                         

                                        I'm glad you mentioned Teacher's Domain. I use the site often for videos and activities relating to my core. I was so pleased today at the announcement on the front page of Teacher's Domain. They are working to make all videos capable of being shown full screen. What a great change for education! Here's a screenshot from the front page!

                                        Screen shot 2010-04-26 at 9.24.53 AM.png

                                          • Re: Free Video Resources

                                            Hey Glen:

                                             

                                            TD has been a staple I've used for some time now, but I find not too many people know about the site's existence. The full screen video has been in the works for some time now, and the people at TD have long been advocates of improving the site and adding resources which can be used for meaningful instructional activities. I've long been pleased with Teachers' Domain.

                                             

                                            What other video resources are out there, particularly primary resources, that we can all share?