2 Replies Latest reply on May 10, 2015 1:56 PM by Bonnie Feather

    Professional Learning Opportunities for Students - Good Idea or Just Good Practice?

    blancaedu

      cgardne offered some wonderful ideas around and models of, professional development that teachers in CO and around the country are taking advantage of. In fact, many educators chimed in to discuss the different models that they are working with in schools.What are some Current Models of Professional Development?

       

      One area of professional development that we don't always talk about is how to approach students. In some schools I've been in, students actually take part in the professional learning activities alongside educators. In others, they are the trainers and give lunchtime or after-school sessions to educators while discussing the benefits they personally see for the use of technology tools.

       

      In all of the excuses we find for not attending or wanting professional learning sessions:

      • Not enough time
      • Not relevant
      • I'm not good at technical stuff
      • Too "techy"; not instructional
      • My students do just fine without
      • I have too much other repsonsibilties
      • etc...

       

      What do you think about schools offering professional learning opportunities for students? Is this a good idea but not practical? Or should we seriously consider offering students these opportunities as we do teachers, as good practice? Or is there another way to think about the question that I am thinking about? Inquiring minds want to know your thoughts glen_w vkajones yasserrs2003@hotmail.com mdconley57 holmesg susangauthier  deb_norton dougemints bonnie_feather TimNielsen ProfWhitby srossitto

        • Re: Professional Learning Opportunities for Students - Good Idea or Just Good Practice?
          glen_w

          I've enjoyed helping train students on what would be PD for teachers. It is fun to see young adults seeing ways to use technology to deliver evidence of learning. I encourage these students to show their teachers the work they have done with technology. One high school student returned to my middle school classroom. She was "bored" with the worksheets assigned by her teacher. I suggested she still do the worksheets and also submit the same material using a tool she learned in my classroom. We discussed how to approach the teacher (politely and not saying his assignment was "boring.") She reported that she told her teacher "Here is the assignment you asked me to do. I wanted to do more with the subject so I also created a short video. May I send you the YouTube link so you may watch it? I am not asking for extra credit - I just want to share my learning." I heard her teacher watched the video and later asked her why she did something she was not asked to do. This conversation brightened up her smile at a later meeting as she said "It was just because I wanted to learn more and share what I learned."

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          • Re: Professional Learning Opportunities for Students - Good Idea or Just Good Practice?
            Bonnie Feather

            What a great question! Professional Development opportunities for students! Of course, we could say that all of the educational opportunities we offer could be seen as professional development opportunities for students.

             

            What might make the opportunities different from their regular class activities? Might it be the perceived relevance? Even in PD for adult educators, relevance to their future make a lot of difference. I've noticed that the perception of relevance and immediate applicability can determine whether or not teachers feel a workshop or class has been worth their while. Prior to the experience, participants often have no feelings that it might be either relevant or immediately applicable. It's only while they are participating that the perception develops.

             

            So...what if we could create this perception of relevance and applicability during the classroom activities? Might that be perceived as professional development for students?

             

            You've got me thinking, blancaedu! I think others are thinking as well. What do you think, yasserrs2003@hotmail.com?

             

            ~bonnie_feather