8 Replies Latest reply on Nov 21, 2015 8:15 PM by glen_w

    School Culture

    jpillmon

      How does one begin to change the negative and antiquated culture in a given school? Where does it start?

        • Re: School Culture
          glen_w

          I think the culture of a school begins with the adults in the building. I'm confident students do not come back from a weekend saying "Let's all get to class on time and turn in all of our work." In my classroom, I regularly show students data of what percent of their assigned work has been turned so far. At the end of term 1 (last week), everyone of my classes had turned in 96% of the assignments. As a result of their hard work, there were 0 students who failed my science classes. NOTE: I did not make grade expectations lower, I raised the standard on making sure all work was completed and turned in.

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          • Re: School Culture
            fbobo

            Hello

            I have to agree with Glen Westbroek. I have worked at high achieving schools and extremely low achieving schools. It starts with the adults in the building and the teacher in the classroom. I worked on a wing with lower performing , disruptive students..All the teachers on the wing (7) , decided to change the culture. We all laid out the same rules and consequences, for students and teachers. No exceptions. It only took one month until our wing had  the no students tardy, no class disruption , everybody working together doing their best. One hour a week , we had reflections and response with students and teachers. The students were able to see how much we cared for their future, they tried their best to achieve. Grades went up, atmosphere went up and all the students at the school wanted to be on our wing.

              • Re: School Culture
                glen_w

                fbobo Your story of the wing you taught in and how teachers helped students learn you all cared about them was empowering. I plan to make sure my students understand that I am truly trying to help them be successful. I look forward to finding ways my students can learn how much I care.

                • Re: School Culture
                  jpillmon

                  Frank, I think you have a point. I move from class to class each day and see different rules, different standards and different expectations.... so the one thing you mentioned that stood out for me is that the teachers in your wing got together to change the culture. I would love to see the teachers move in that direction, but they are seemingly out of gas. I know that it starts with the adults in the building, but the adults in the building....can not, will not, have not, whatever, it is not happening.

                • Re: School Culture

                  it start from you..

                  i think to change others we must first change our thinking..Change Begins from You 

                  Cheers!

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                  • Re: School Culture

                    To change the negative attitude and antiquated culture first conduct a meeting and talk about a good changes, second try to implement the tackled meeting about the good changes in the school, and third doing practicing and making it as a rule and regulation in a given school.

                     

                    What would be the solution to the particular problem will be the helping thing to help change the antiquated culture.

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                      • Re: School Culture
                        Amber Muzammil

                        I totally agree with you, but meeting and all the planning go vain when it comes to implementation, because deep within our own selves we don't want to change.

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                          • Re: School Culture
                            glen_w

                            Are there teachers you know who want to change? Perhaps they are afraid of what others might think of doing something different. Perhaps, like me, they wonder will the change help students better understand the material. When I consider changes, I always ask "will it help students learn better?"