10 Replies Latest reply on Jun 29, 2016 10:14 AM by intelnoemi

    Programming Integration in the Classroom

    iVelvet

      I just read this article written by Chris Bartlo, a computer science and math teacher at Wilson High School in Portland, Oregon.  Programming is problem solving.  It requires precision and is a craft that now involves a much more social aspect to it.  Instead of a lone coder working alone, coders now collaborate and build off each others ideas.  Math is a consistent thread that is required for a program that functions successfully. I agree with all the points he has brought to light.

       

       

      My question is - what does this look like in the daily learning of the classroom? 

       

      As I worked with my 4th grade teachers today to weave together some connected STEAM lessons, I wondered how this would look as our teachers begin to implement a new Bridges math curriculum this next year.

       

      What are your simple ideas to insert more opportunities for programming into the daily learning?

        • Re: Programming Integration in the Classroom
          SyedaKhadija

          thanks a lot for sharing the article. I best line I like, "When failure is part of the path towards success, students build perseverance in solving problems." But for us integrating Maths and creating interdisciplinary connections is a huge challenge.

          • Re: Programming Integration in the Classroom
            vkajones

            iVelvet thanks for posting this article. I actually just did a presentation today at a local conference about similar information. For me, I think of Computer Science as a way to giving students basic computer skills. When I say basic skills, I am referring to the computational skills of collaboration, communication, persistence, problem solving and creativity. These skills should be evident and taught in all grade and subject areas.  I also pointed out that these skills also enable students to practice real world problems that they will be solving when they enter the work place.  Corporations are looking for employees that have embedded these skills, especially communication, collaboration, creativity and persistence.

             

            What I found interesting was that I had a few attendees from several large cooperations who said that they are encouraging their own children to explore computer science careers. They also shared that they are still getting young people that are entering the work place for the first time that still do not have basic 21st century skills. They also said that the jobs sometimes become very stressful when they have to collaborate on projects.  My question... are universities not seeing teaching these skills as essential or is it that these skills have not been embedded into their lifestyles and once they are on their own, they revert back to their old habits.

              • Re: Programming Integration in the Classroom
                SyedaKhadija

                vkajones agree with you. I think it's both, on one hand educational institutions should consider 21st century skills as essential life skills, and on the other hand they are also not part of lifestyles. Many a times as employers we face this dilemma, and it is so sad to see that these young people with at least 16 to 18 years of formal education are unable to cope with the new trends and find it difficult to become part of productive work force.

                • Re: Programming Integration in the Classroom
                  glen_w

                  I just got emails from two teachers at my school. Both are in the same master's program. this week those in the class were given an assignment that was rather "open ended" in nature. From my peers I learned that over 50% of the class asked questions such as:

                  1. Can't you just tell us what this will look like?
                  2. How do you want us to present this?
                  3. Is there a specific format we all should follow?
                  4. When you say "research" what do you mean?
                  5. If I am doing this much learning on my own, why am I paying to be in this Master's program?

                  It seemed like all these comments indicate teachers who are less ready to use 21st century skills in their own learning process. What do you think should be done to help teachers be comfortable using 21st century skills (so they will allow students to do the same?)

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                    • Re: Programming Integration in the Classroom
                      iVelvet

                      Wow~these are the behaviors that we are working so hard to dissolve!!!  How sad that these bright students moving to further their education don't see it as an opportunity to think, grow and engage in collaborative projects/research.  From my own experience, where I teach, I know there are many teacher working to turn these behaviors around by exploring more personalized learning and giving students the resources and opportunities to take ownership of their learning.

                      2 of 2 people found this helpful
                        • Re: Programming Integration in the Classroom
                          glen_w

                          I and a couple of other teachers started a "sharing group" this past year. We named it "Down the rabbit hole." (Think Alice in Wonderland.) We often shared ideas and found embedded links lead us to new ideas and discussions. Thus the group name. Near the end of the year, our principal, who loves these discussions, invited all faculty members to participate. One teacher often exhibited similar behaviors to those in the course I mentioned. After about a month of our email sharing, he began making comments relating to change and how it might help students. In my opinion, patience is a virtue - especially when dealing with education change and teachers.

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                    • Re: Programming Integration in the Classroom
                      MBrownEdTech

                      Great article iVelvet! Many of my teachers ask how they can make this type of learning happen on a daily basis. I responded that many of them have students do "Morning Work" or "Bell Work" as they come in. Here is an article about having an alternative to "morning work":Exploration Boxes {An Alternative to Morning Work} - Primary Press 

                       

                      Instead of (or even just once or twice a week) these worksheets, how fun and beneficial would morning work be if students could practice typing skills through coding? Have you heard of Bitsbox.com? Scroll to the bottom and they have teacher freebies. Teachers could totally have their coding challenges in a "morning work box" and have kids use Chromebooks or tablets.  This could be one way for teachers to start inserting more opportunities for programming into the daily learning.

                       

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                      • Re: Programming Integration in the Classroom
                        holmesg

                        Sometimes the simple ideas are better at helping students to understand a concept.  I work with teachers to integrate coding into the curriculum.  The strategy that I use that has been most effective is unplugged activities that teach the concept prior to having students to actually code.

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                        • Re: Programming Integration in the Classroom
                          intelnoemi

                          Ciertamente maestro, hoy se requieren que en las aulas los maestros que tenemos una gran responsabilidad social hoy, mas que nunca, debemos de desarrollar aun mas las habilidades sociales que se requieren en estos tiempos, para responder a los desafíos que se nos presentan en la actualidad. como por ejemplo la construcción  de la programación  interáreas en forma colaborativa utilizando los diferentes entornos en red es ahora un gran desafío a responder.

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