16 Replies Latest reply on Nov 7, 2010 12:43 PM by motherofthree

    Data Collecting, Tips, Tools and Strategies...

    vkajones

      bunnyatwork_small.jpg

       

      Greetings!  This month’s activity is dedicated to data collection tips, tools, and tricks which coincides with the October Intel Teach Live  webinar “Collaboration and Communication Tools Featuring Wallwisher”.  We are hoping this master list will help us all fill our digital toolboxes.

       

       

      We all collect data and files from students and teachers - everything from images, writing samples, inventories, questions, and answers.  What resources do you use?  What data collection stumbling blocks and challenges have you faced? What tips can you give to help other teachers to avoid these problems?  We’d love to hear them.  Please share your examples, tools and strategies in this thread. 

       

       

       

      All contributions to this thread in the month of September 2010,  will be entered in a drawing for a

      PC Classmate (but the thread will remain active forever:. What better freebie to share data collected with others  Unfortunately, for legal reasons, we can only ship prizes within the U.S.

       

       

      Thank you

       

      Vanessa and Dyane

        • Re: Data Collecting, Tips, Tools and Strategies...
          dgoodman_1958

          Vanessa, the webinar tonight was fabulous as always.  I always learn new things when I tune in.  You guys do a great job of planning back-ups when planned online resources have their moments as Wallwisher did tonight.  I have had the same problems several times over the past couple of weeks.  However, it IS a great tool for gathering some quick information from participants/students. 

           

          Here are a few of my WallWisher examples:

          Intel Leadership Forum 

          http://www.wallwisher.com/wall/nc1to1july15A

          http://www.wallwisher.com/wall/nc1to1july15B

           

          Technology training

          http://www.wallwisher.com/wall/vr-halifax

           

          Another resource I use for collecting data are Google Forms.  They are very easy to set up and now you can choose from a variety of themes.  They embed very well into wikis and blogs making it easier for students and staff to access. 

           

          The stumbling blocks to any online tools are the availability 24/7.  As we experienced with wallwisher tonight, they sometimes experience technical difficulties.  Always have a backup. 

            • Re: Data Collecting, Tips, Tools and Strategies...
              vkajones

              Thanks Deborah for the feedback and for attending another Intel Teach Live session. Wallwisher is still misbehaving, so I'm not able to view your examples, but I'll keep trying. Thanks so much for posting the examples.  I was thinking Wallwisher would be great for taking the place of the comment cards that we use in the Intel Teach training. Your examples are probably that. Thanks for sharing.

               

              Vanessa

            • Re: Data Collecting, Tips, Tools and Strategies...
              vkajones

              Thanks everyone for attending another Intel Teach Live session. If you were not able to attend, you can click on this  link and enjoy the resoruces, conversations and integrated ideas for collecting data and using electronic bulletin boards.

               

              Vanessa

              • another sticky wall
                Bonnie Feather

                I love Wallwisher, but lately I have been preferring Stixy. I have not yet looked at Lino, but will do that after I post!  Stixy allows you to type more characters, you can change the color and font of the notes, and I think it's easier to add images, links, and documents.

                 

                I've seen it used for student groups to collect resources collaboratively to prepare for a project, and for a teacher to ask ongoing questions of students during a project.  It's great to gather materials prior to teaching, and for students to "chime in" on a question.

                 

                Data collection: it's not what I think of as a place to gather empirical evidence, but more for soft evidence.

                 

                I look forward to other comments in this activity!

                 

                ~Bonnie

                  • Lino It
                    Bonnie Feather

                    OK, I have just begun to explore Lino It, with the "How to Lino" wall, and it's my new favorite!  You can move the wall around with the hand!  You can email the stickies!  This looks GREAT, and it's a perfect illustration of why I like the Engage Community!  It is my best source of new tools and ideas!

                     

                    Create yourself an account NOW, and enjoy!

                  • Data Collecting Recollection
                    Bonnie Feather

                    I was pondering this question again tonight and I thought about the way I used to collect data.  It was on paper!  little papers worked for about 10 minutes, clipboards with checklists, anecdotal records, and test papers...

                     

                    We educators always need more information about our students in order to do the best for them as individuals, but these days, I vote for anything which gathers and aggregates data in a simple format which allows me to analyze and sort through it in order to gain information, but most of all, does not use paper!

                     

                    Technology and web 2.0 tools have made such a difference in this regard- it's frightening to remember the "old days!"

                     

                    ~Bonnie

                    • Re: Data Collecting, Tips, Tools and Strategies...

                      This is a great discussion!  So often data collecting is done in random fashion.  I do like lino, as well as a lot of the google tools.

                      • Re: Data Collecting, Tips, Tools and Strategies...

                        It is a "crazy" idea but I really like Poll Everywhere:  http://www.polleverywhere.com/. Participants use cell phones to answer- the messages are posted on the page and can be displayed. Answers can be turned into a PowerPoint with a built in feature.

                         

                        ~Jennifer

                        • Re: Data Collecting, Tips, Tools and Strategies...

                          My new favorite collection tool is LiveClassTech because it allows for real time responses from both local and remote sites.  Since most of my time is spent in distance learning classrooms, this tool put together the best features of a student response system and a backchannel.  It pulls quiet people into the discussion and/or provides immediate feedback.  Works with smartphones as well as computers.  (http://www.liveclasstech.com/)

                          • Re: Data Collecting, Tips, Tools and Strategies...

                            In our district, we collect several different things to represent student growth . We keep student portfolios, keep an electronic gradebook using eSIS that is accessible to both students and parents, and have more formal data from the student's MAP results and state-wide testing results.

                             

                            I think the biggest roadblock is interpreting all of this data. Many teachers do not have the time to actually look at the data and be able to reflect on their teaching practice to differentiate instruction for students. I have heard of data coaches that support schools, but how will we ever be successful at changing instruction if teachers aren't able to access the data or are exposed to resources to meet student's needs?

                             

                            Some things we are doing differently in our district is we have hired 18 rotating teachers. These teachers will serve as substitute teachers in buildings to allow groups of 3 teachers at a time from each school (we have almost 200 schools) to attend an all day data retreat. They will get access to their student data, be shown how to interpret that data and will also be given direct activities on how to work with the different levels in their class. This session will only focus on math and reading though...

                             

                            I'd love to hear how other districts are dealing with data and getting it to the teachers!

                              • Re: Data Collecting, Tips, Tools and Strategies...
                                tdiener

                                Nicol, Collecting data is easy, making sense of data and applying it to learning is so much more difficult. The data retreats you mention are pretty innovative. I'd like to know more about the program as it progresses this school year. Many districts here in NY use DataMentor. I've worked with several school districts to train teachers with this tool. I think data mining has a lot to offer but I do find it a hard sell with teachers.

                              • Re: Data Collecting, Tips, Tools and Strategies...

                                A really cool tool for collecting information about one's students is to use the interactive Bio-Cube (http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/student-interactives/cube-30057.html) from the Thinkfinity partner ReadWriteThink.  This activity provides a 6-sided cube which students can use to give their name, time period, and place; personal background; personality traits; person's significance; biggest obstacle; and important quotation. The  finished printout can be folded into a fun cube shape that can be used  for future reference. This is a great way for students to learn about each other at the beginning of a new class.

                                Lynne

                                • Re: Data Collecting, Tips, Tools and Strategies...
                                  glen_w

                                  Vanessa,

                                   

                                  My favorite tool for collecting science lab data is Google Forms. It takes time to make sure the form is effectively prepared for the lab, but the time is well spent. Students are able to easily enter their lab data. After data is collected, we project up the data spreadsheet to discuss, evaluate, and identify information from the results. During one lab, I had all of my students and all of a friend in Alabama's students entering their data in a spreadsheet. The data was enormous - but we quickly were able to identify outliers, graph data, and identify expected results. The more I use Google Forms, the more I like the results they help me obtain.

                                  • Re: Data Collecting, Tips, Tools and Strategies...
                                    glen_w

                                    Another excellent tool to use with data is Create-a-graph. I have students enter their data online (similar to putting the data into a google doc or Excel. They then select and can create their own graphs from the data. In my opinion, it is easier to create a graph from this tool than by using a google or Excel spreadsheet.

                                      • Re: Data Collecting, Tips, Tools and Strategies...

                                        I use a lot of data collection tools this year. More so than before, Aims Web, Excel, our on line grading system, VPort, and grade keeper to name most of them.

                                         

                                        I am constantly collecting and analyzing data and comparing it to work samples.

                                         

                                        The use of create a graph is always a helful tool for reteaching about graphs and helping students create visual representations of data.

                                         

                                        Roadblocks: this can be time consuming.

                                         

                                        Benefits: multiple representations of knowledge and understanding: verifiable data