6 Replies Latest reply on Dec 14, 2010 9:01 AM by KristyBoo

    Intregrating Intel with Place Value Understanding

      Greetings to all! I am an elementary math coach. I am noticing a trend that our students are having difficulty linking factual and procedural knowledge to conceptual and metacognitive knowledge. I am looking for ways to help bridge that gap. I am new to intel and would love any ideas or strategies you can share. Thanks in advance.

        • Re: Intregrating Intel with Place Value Understanding
          Bonnie Feather

          Can you do a little break-down of their successes and skills- like an old-fashioned task-analysis?  What is the indicator to you that they don't have the conceptual knowledge?  What kinds of metacognitive tasks have you assigned and what are their responses?

           

          Have you used the concepts (reall, have THEY used) in some Project-Based Learning tasks?

           

          There are some great math folks here.  With more detail, I'm sure you will get some good tips.

           

          ~Bonnie

            • Re: Intregrating Intel with Place Value Understanding

              Thanks for your response. You have asked great guiding questions that I will use for my teachers. I can give you an example where I feel there is a disconnect.  A student may be able to recite their multiplication facts, however is they are needed to use that same multiplication fact to answer a word problem the student is unable to answer the question. The student is not able to make the connection between what is means to multiply and  how to apply that knowledge to solve a problem. In regards to problem based learning, there some some components that are being used. I definitely feel that is an area that could use more development. Thanks.

                • Re: Intregrating Intel with Place Value Understanding

                  Naomi is exactly right. Our students can get the basics: If I post a problem on the board that say "how do you find the improper fraction for 3 1/2, they can do it. But, given to them in a word problem without actually saying 'turn this into an improper fraction,' and they're lost. There's a disconnect between their reading comprehension, and basic strategies for knowing how to set up a problem to solve. This has been very difficult, as a classroom teacher, to figure out how to move them from this conceptual to a more abstract learning. Any ideas on how to fill in those gaps and help our students become more successful thinkers?

              • Re: Intregrating Intel with Place Value Understanding

                Great Question!!

                Often times when taught in isolation, math skills can be aquired, yet lost in the real world. A great way to combat this in the classroom is to guide the students in the aquisition of the targeted skill within the context of a real life problem.begin with the context of a real usage in the classroom and use that to teach the skill as they need it.

                THis is where effective questioning really comes to play. A strong guiding question that interests them and spurs them to want to solve a problem, will provide the cognitive framework where the skill will reside. Think of an effective filing system vs. a huge pile of papers. When taught in isolation, temporary mastery is gained yet often lost like an important document that is difficult to find in the big pile of papers. Yet, when the skill is offered as part of a solution to an interesting, relevant problem, the skill is filed away in a place where retrieval and expanded application is much more common.

                An example of this would be to find a common place where mixed numbers are used in real life, like a recipe. Begin with something like:

                A recipe calls for 1/4 cup of sugar. If the cook needs to make 25 batches of the recipe, how much sugar will be needed in all?

                No cook would express the answer in 25/4. So the student is encouraged to put the 4ths into groups and end up with 6 and 1/4.

                Use problems in the classroom and use hw time for skill practice.  It is very similar to the questioning logic used in our Intel courses. Move beyond just the facts. Ask the kids to apply the skills.

                HOpe this helped.

                1 of 1 people found this helpful
                  • Re: Intregrating Intel with Place Value Understanding

                    I truly appreciate your feedback. Since this post, I have researched different methods for introducing the problem-based learning method as a strategy for intergrating the math and well as patient problem solving. Teaching anything in isolation will not yield mastery and if our students do not understand why it is important to learn that information. Having great guiding questions are also essential. I am attaching a copy of a document from NCTM on "The Art of Questioning in Mathematics".

                      • Re: Intregrating Intel with Place Value Understanding

                        "When taught in isolation, temporary mastery is gained yet often lost like an important document that is difficult to find in the big pile of papers. Yet, when the skill is offered as part of a solution to an interesting, relevant problem, the skill is filed away in a place where retrieval and expanded application is much more common." -Peter Stapleford (see above)

                         

                        I love this analogy of how students process and retain information. This was a helpful visual for me to 'see' how they truly get it (or don't). I will take these ideas into consideration and see how they work out with my students.