14 Replies Latest reply on Jun 5, 2011 8:18 PM by glen_w

    Phun Classroom Products

    glen_w

      I watched this YouTube video "Physical Impossibilities in My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic" and was excited to see the process students were asked to follow. Apparently the teacher asked them to take a TV show and identify three places in  the video where Physics was used inappropriately. The My Little Pony segments were fun to watch and see how students applied physics knowledge to the subject.

       

       

      I thought about how engaging this process must have been for students. What products have you seen students create that are similar in how well they engage students? I think it would be Phun to create a list of similar products Intel Teach members have done or seen done. Please share your ideas in this discussion.

        • Re: Phun Classroom Products

          Glen, how fun.  The young man also has a great sense of humor.  What I really liked about this was his proof of the impossibility of a "sonic rainboom".  Not only did he show what was wrong, but why.  He really understands the physics of the problem. 

           

          Wouldn't it be fun to find the same impossiblities in Star Wars and Star Trek or other sci-fi movies.  Has anyone else looked at those?

           

          Neil

          • Re: Phun Classroom Products
            dougemints

            In the last few weeks of school one year, during my 9th grade Physical Science class, I had some students ask if we could watch a movie.  I told them we probably wouldn't be watching any films unless we had some scientific reason to do so.

             

            They wanted to watch the Wizard of Oz which had just been re-released to video.  At the end of class period, they challenged me and I accepted.  If they could predict 20 examples of Physical Science in the movie that we could then discuss as a class, I would write the lesson plan to district video policy for the experience.

             

            A couple of days went by and no mention of the movie came about.  Then, one day after the bell rang I was handed a list of 40 excellent examples.  I mean they had really gone above what I was thinking would be found and I had grown up watching the movie!!

             

            So, we used the Wizard of Oz as a 3-day study prompt for locating and discussing Physical Science examples both in the movie and in also in the reality of our daily lives.  Then later, the students made presentations about one of their chosen examples and if the way it was depicted in the movie followed what we know about those particular principles of science.

             

            Not a great example,  but certainly a "Phun" experience for teacher and student.

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              • Re: Phun Classroom Products
                Bonnie Feather

                I love examples of students coming up with their justification!  What a good teacher you must be to set the challenge, then

                meet their response!

                • Re: Phun Classroom Products

                  Well talking about, pHun ( you can guess that I am a high school Chemistry teacher ), I had my students work on something similar to your movie project. My students picked a movie clip or TV show that used a chemistry principle and used extensive research to show whether it is fact or fiction. Students had to write a technical research paper (yes, I am not very loved right now by my students), but these papers look great. I teach AP Chemistry to 11th and 12th grade students. Can not wait to see their movie clips with power points presentations tomorrow on the theme of "fact or fiction." Ready to debunk some myths created by Hollywood- ChemIsTry style!!

                    • Re: Phun Classroom Products

                      Kavita, as a music major, I have found this thread to be a lot of fun, but was wondering if any of the science/math teachers out there could throw some examples my way as to good movies, or not so good, that really take liberties with science.  This sounds like a great way to really engage teachers during a training so that they can take it back to their classrooms. 

                       

                      Neil

                        • Improbable Research and more
                          Bonnie Feather

                          I've been listening to a rather "irreverent" podcast lately as I fall asleep at night.  It's "Stuff You Should Know," created by the bloggers from "How Stuff Works." I enjoy it, but there are frequent bleeps on some podcasts, so I would be careful about listening (and possibly editing in Audacity or somilar software) before using in class.

                           

                          Anyway, last night's listening selection (it was not the current podcast- I'm catching up on them) mentioned a website several times.  "Improbable Research" is a site with many "articles" about real research that seems a bit odd to the casual observer.  Sometimes it can be quite funny as well as useful.  Again, you might want to sift through it before turning kids loose on the school network.  But it has lots of good information to illustrate many science concepts.

                           

                          While they were at it, they were talking about the annual "Ig-Nobel prize" and the "Darwin Awards."   I usually only hear about these through emails that I don't forward, but they could be useful tools in class as well, in the hands of a careful, thoughtful teacher.

                           

                          After Neil's request for movies that take liberties with science, I know this doesn't exactly fit the bill, but it seemed a possible fit for some.

                           

                          Have fun!  (And remember- not all of these sites are fit for students in our charge. Of course, they will all look at them outside school, but that's not our concern.)

                           

                          ~Bonnie

                          • Re: Phun Classroom Products
                            glen_w

                            Neil,

                             

                            I take a LOT of liberties with the use of cartoons in the classroom. My principal usually laughs when I "request permission" to show a cartoon and explain how it directly relates to the state core. One of my favorite Physics cartoons is The Bugs BunnyRoadrunner Show. In less than five minutes, you can have a HUGE discussion about a specific physics concept. I also appreciate how the Roadrunner provides examples of the "E" (engineering) in STEM.

                             

                            I bet we could do an entire discussion on just The Bugs Bunny/Roadrunner Show.

                          • Re: Phun Classroom Products
                            glen_w

                            Kavita,

                             

                            I hope you will share how this project turns out. While the research sounds like a "groaner", I think many students in the classroom project I mentioned did a lot of research to show their knowledge of Physics. It sounds like your students should have a greater understanding of Chemistry as a result of your activity.