2 Replies Latest reply on Jun 1, 2011 9:29 AM by Bonnie Feather

    How do we reconcile the idealism in Education as setting a goal for excellence/higher expectations in the real setting of existing educational system?

      Many educators would visualize the excellence in education as easy as saying a word. I said this because I was once like this...looking back I can say now that there is nothing wrong with setting a goal for at least you would see if you attain it or not. Most likely you would see how you exceeded the goal that was set then.

      Thinking how this might happen is not an easy task.

       

      To reconcile the idealism to realism requires rigorous action, positive initiative, positive treatment as well as looking at a situation in a new perspective. That challenge is infront of every teacher everyday...With all  the knowledge gain from different universities and colleges most likely it is one's professionalism that would allow the educator  to respond to the given situation positively, most likely, with all the courage gathered this would lead to solve the problem in the school or in the community.....by trying not to contribute to the problem anymore. The best solution so as the best answer to the present need.

      A new way of saying whatever the demand so the supply should be...

       

      This kind of goal setting requires consistency, goal oriented team and constant reminder of a collaborative effort as in working together towards one goal.

      This process is not an easy work for the teachers either... so as the students... if the students are  ready for this, teachers would exert more  effort to make it better.

        • Re: How do we reconcile the idealism in Education as setting a goal for excellence/higher expectations in the real setting of existing educational system?

          Imelda, I was struck by your first statement, "Many educators would visualize the excellence in education as easy as saying a word". I agree with you.  I was a classroom teacher for 34 years and I saw many a lot of rules, etc that came down from state and federal levels for education.  It was and is my experience that true change will come when the individual classroom teacher simply does what they know is right for their kids.  No matter where we live, our students are the same, they want to learn.  Good teaching is hard work, but as we set goals for our classrooms, our kids see that it is important to learn and fail sometimes, but we keep on working and in the end our kids do learn. 

           

          I hope that makes sense.

           

          Neil

          • idealism in Education
            Bonnie Feather

            We do struggle on in our own classrooms with out own personal goals for excellence in teaching and excellence in learning by our students.  Sometimes it is difficult to reconcile the dull legalities, especially the focus on testing we face here in the U.S.  I need to learn more about whether that is true in other countries.  As government entities try to make our education systems better, they lose sight of the personal factors in education.  A large system like any government agency can only affect the surface because that's what they see, understand, and can measure.

             

            I long for the day when a system allows teachers to bring back and celebrate the personal!  Do you think it will happen in our lifetimes?

             

            However, this time of year is always gratifying to me.  I always receive a few graduation announcements from former first graders who are completing high school, college, or graduate school.  I have received one of each this year.  They always contain a few sentences which remind me that we do have an effect on individual students.  Probably many more than contact us!  Even if we don't have that memorable effect on each individual each year, we hope that one of their teachers each year impact a student in a positive way.

             

            Let us all remember that the teacher is the strongest influence in the classroom (sometimes the hallway) and that our job is valuable every day.  We don't need recognition form the testing agencies to know that and to continue our quest!

             

            ~Bonnie